Tag: Wordpress

Dating Advice For Men

Guys are you still having problems understanding us women? If so, here’s some good dating advice from different women. Read.Do.Repeat.

 

  1. Be direct – if there’s something you want from us, let us know. We aren’t mind readers either, ya’ know.
  2. Don’t feel entitled – just because you have more options than we do when it comes to dating, doesn’t mean you should hold that over our head. As the woman, I am still the prize and will continue to carry myself accordingly
  3. Be secure with yourself – we all have our own insecurities, but yours should never play out in our relationship
  4. Be honest – this should be without saying.
  5. Be faithful – I can just drop the mic on this one
  6. Don’t lead us on – If you’re not looking for a relationship, let us know in the beginning. We may want the same (and we may not). Just don’t waste our time
  7. Learn to communicate – there’s nothing wrong with opening up, especially if you want the same from us. If you want a real relationship, it’s imperative that you learn how to communicate anyhow because that’s what will help us stay together long-term
  8. Leave the whole “I don’t show emotion” at the door – it is not 1960 anymore so there is no need to hold up a façade with your male ego. We NEED to hear/see/feel your emotions because that helps draw us closer to you
  9. Be consistent – however you treat us in the beginning, is how you need to continue to treat us throughout the relationship
  10. Validate your partner’s feelings – this doesn’t mean you have to agree with us, but at least hear us out
  11. Shower daily – for the love of pete, shower!
  12. Don’t purposely omit information – this is caused lying, men!
  13. Deal with your past traumas – don’t drag us down because of your issues. Don’t be afraid to see a therapist. Fix whatever your problems may be so that we can have a healthy, happy relationship
  14. Talk to me (like real talk) – we need you to open up to us; have a real conversation with us.
  15. Date me!

BLACK HISTORY MONTH IS BACK!!

FEBRUARY IS HERE! This is the time of year when I talk about Black history & all the contributions Africans Americans have made to America. I really think that the accomplishments of my people should be highlighted all year long, so I do my part by sharing notable African Americans history every week even after Black History Month is over. And since it is February, I will also be writing about dating, relationships and, of course, love!

Here’s what Chocolate Vent will look like this month –

  • Question of the Day: This will be on hold until March.
  • #SundaySermon: I’ll continue to post a weekly sermon & a quote of the week from an African American preacher.
  • #MeteorologyMonday: Highlighting famous African American meteorologists.
  • #TuesdayArt: Discovering African American artists from around the country!
  • Wednesday: #HumpDayLoveDay I will write a post about dating, love, relationships or all 3!
  • #TheologyThursday: Read about different African American preachers/pastoral leaders across the country.
  • #FashionFriday: Meet some African American fashion designers from the past & the present.
  • #SaturdayStamps: Notable African Americans who have their own U.S. postage stamp.

If you haven’t already, please follow me on Twitter, Facebook & Instagram.

I hope you are able to learn something about African American culture from my posts this month. Happy reading but more importantly Happy Black History Month!

#ThursdayReads: Lucille Clifton

CLifton

Lucille Clifton was born in Depew, New York, on June 27, 1936. Her first book of poems, Good Times (Random House, 1969), was rated one of the best books of the year by the New York Times.

Clifton remained employed in state and federal government positions until 1971, when she became a writer in residence at Coppin State College in Baltimore, Maryland, where she completed two collections: Good News About the Earth (Random House, 1972) and An Ordinary Woman (Random House, 1974).

She was the author of  several other collections of poetry, including Blessing the Boats: New and Selected Poems 1988–2000 (BOA Editions, 2000), which won the National Book Award; Good Woman: Poems and a Memoir 1969-1980 (BOA Editions, 1987), which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize; and Two-Headed Woman (University of Massachusetts Press, 1980), also a Pulitzer Prize nominee as well as the recipient of the University of Massachusetts Press Juniper Prize.

Clifton was also the author of Generations: A Memoir (Random House, 1976) and more than sixteen books for children, written expressly for an African-American audience.

Of her work, Rita Dove has written: “In contrast to much of the poetry being written today—intellectualized lyricism characterized by an application of inductive thought to unusual images—Lucille Clifton’s poems are compact and self-sufficient…Her revelations then resemble the epiphanies of childhood and early adolescence, when one’s lack of preconceptions about the self allowed for brilliant slippage into the metaphysical, a glimpse into an egoless, utterly thingful and serene world.”

Her honors include an Emmy Award from the American Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, a Lannan Literary Award, two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Shelley Memorial Award, the YM-YWHA Poetry Center Discovery Award, and the 2007 Ruth Lilly Prize.

In 1999, she was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. She served as Poet Laureate for the State of Maryland from 1979 to 1985, and Distinguished Professor of Humanities at St. Mary’s College of Maryland.

After a long battle with cancer, Lucille Clifton died on February 13, 2010, at the age of seventy-three.