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HAPPY MONDAY!!!

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Completely Satisfied

Today’s Scripture

“Blessed, fortunate, happy and spiritually prosperous…are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, uprightness and right standing with God, for they shall be completely satisfied” (Matthew 5:6 AMP).

Today’s Word

God longs to pour out his abundant blessing on every area of your life. He wants you to live completely satisfied. When you hunger and thirst for righteousness–God’s way of doing things–then you will live in complete satisfaction. You direct your hunger by choosing what you focus on. For example, if you focus on your favorite food, if you start thinking about it early in the morning, and all throughout the day, chances are, by the end of the day you’ll be eating it! What you give your attention to, you will desire.

In the same way, the more you give your attention to God and His Word, the more you will hunger for Him. Just like the scripture promises, when you hunger for righteousness, you will be completely satisfied. The world offers so many things for you to give your attention to, but they aren’t things that will satisfy. You might think you want a particular car, or certain clothes, or live in a particular neighborhood. There’s nothing wrong with those things, but understand that “things” won’t ever satisfy you. Recognize that only God will satisfy you. As you hunger for Him, you’ll live in peace and blessing and live completely satisfied all the days of your life!

A Prayer for Today

Father in Heaven, I come to You today, I ask for forgiveness for allowing anything to capture my heart and attention more than You. I choose today to give You top priority, and choose to hunger for Your righteousness. In Jesus’ Name. Amen.

– Joel & Victoria Osteen

#SaturdayStamps: Dr. Allison Davis

A noted psychologist, educator, and author, Dr. Allison Davis (1902-83) helped raise national awareness of the civil rights issue through his books, lectures, and conferences. Graduating as valedictorian from Williams College in 1924, he went on to earn two master’s degrees from Harvard, where he directed various research projects.
In 1942, Davis received his doctorate from the University of Chicago, where he served as a faculty member for the next 40 years. A sharp critic of intelligence testing, he challenged the cultural bias of the testing system and fought for the understanding of human potential without regard to race or class.
Widely acclaimed, he received numerous awards. The University of Chicago’s John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor of Education, he was also named Educator of the Year in 1971. During the 60s, Dr. Davis served on the President’s Commission on Civil Rights and later as vice chairman of the Department of Labor’s Commission on Manpower Retraining. Dr. Davis wrote ten respected books, was one of the first African American professors to be granted tenure at a major predominantly white northern university, and served on the President’s Commission on Civil Rights—and so much more.

 

Dating Advice For Women

Women, do you wanna know what advice men want to give us? Read below to get some insight on how men really feel, directly from the horse’s mouth –

  • “Encourage me!”
  • “I need a partner, not a mom”
  • “Sweats & no makeup is just as cute as being dolled up”
  • “Just because your man has a critical opinion of you doesn’t mean he’s lost interest in you.
    Just fix it”
  • “Don’t be mean”
  • “Exercise good hygiene”
  • “Remember, men have feelings too”
  • “Stop entertaining men you don’t want to commit to”
  • “Say what you mean & mean what you say”
  • “I love natural hair!”
  • “Stop expecting us to give you our best effort when you’re still exploring your options”
  • “Stop trying to compete with me”
  • “Be true to who you are”
  • “Don’t be afraid to be spontaneous”
  • “Learn to trust (again)”
  • “Don’t be inconsolable – if I can’t calm you down, then why call me?”
  • “Don’t always listen to your friend’s advice”
  • “Have at least 3 dishes you can cook really well”
  • “Learn to apologize earnestly”
  • “Stop bringing up old stuff”
  • “A man shouldn’t be “like” you. You need a yin to your yang”
  • “Listen to understand & not to respond”
  • “Don’t think being crazy is ‘cute’”
  • “Don’t put everything over social media – leave something for just the two of us”
  • “Stop thinking that every man wants you – they don’t!”
  • “Everything doesn’t always click on the first date. Give things a chance”
  • “Don’t listen to Steve Harvey”
  • “Reciprocate some of the actions you want to see from him”
  • “Go in without expectations”

How To Attract Love

I came across a meme that expressed several ways to attract the love you’re looking for. Read below & let me know what you think in the comments!

  • Acknowledge red flags as soon as they surface
  • Know what it is that you are looking for
  • Be able to describe what it is you’re looking for
  • Be emotionally available
  • Raise your standards (if they’re not high enough)
  • Be who you want to attract
  • Don’t get stuck on 1 option – there is more than one person out there for you
  • Look for love in everyone
  • Don’t be afraid to take a chance!

#SaturdayStamps: Dinah Washington

Dinah Washington was at once one of the most beloved and controversial singers of the mid-20th century — beloved to her fans, devotees, and fellow singers; controversial to critics who still accuse her of selling out her art to commerce and bad taste. Her principal sin, apparently, was to cultivate a distinctive vocal style that was at home in all kinds of music, be it R&B, blues, jazz, middle of the road pop — and she probably would have made a fine gospel or country singer had she the time. Hers was a gritty, salty, high-pitched voice, marked by absolute clarity of diction and clipped, bluesy phrasing. Washington‘s personal life was turbulent, with seven marriages behind her, and her interpretations showed it, for she displayed a tough, totally unsentimental, yet still gripping hold on the universal subject of lost love. She has had a huge influence on R&B and jazz singers who have followed in her wake, notably Nancy Wilson, Esther Phillips, and Diane Schuur, and her music is abundantly available nowadays via the huge seven-volume series The Complete Dinah Washington on Mercury.

Born Ruth Lee Jones, she moved to Chicago at age three and was raised in a world of gospel, playing the piano and directing her church choir. At 15, after winning an amateur contest at the Regal Theatre, she began performing in nightclubs as a pianist and singer, opening at the Garrick Bar in 1942. Talent manager Joe Glaser heard her there and recommended her to Lionel Hampton, who asked her to join his band. Hampton says that it was he who gave Ruth Jones the name Dinah Washington, although other sources claim it was Glaser or the manager of the Garrick Bar. In any case, she stayed with Hampton from 1943 to 1946 and made her recording debut for Keynote at the end of 1943 in a blues session organized by Leonard Feather with a sextet drawn from the Hampton band. With Feather‘s “Evil Gal Blues” as her first hit, the records took off, and by the time she left Hampton to go solo, Washington was already an R&B headliner. Signing with the young Mercury label, Washington produced an enviable string of Top Ten hits on the R&B charts from 1948 to 1955, singing blues, standards, novelties, pop covers, even Hank Williams‘ “Cold, Cold Heart.” She also recorded many straight jazz sessions with big bands and small combos, most memorably with Clifford Brown on Dinah Jams but also with Cannonball Adderley, Clark Terry, Ben Webster, Wynton Kelly, and the young Joe Zawinul (who was her regular accompanist for a couple of years).

In 1959, Washington made a sudden breakthrough into the mainstream pop market with “What a Diff’rence a Day Makes,” a revival of a Dorsey Brothers hit set to a Latin American bolero tune. For the rest of her career, she would concentrate on singing ballads backed by lush orchestrations for Mercury and Roulette, a formula similar to that of another R&B-based singer at that time, Ray Charles, and one that drew plenty of fire from critics even though her basic vocal approach had not changed one iota. Although her later records could be as banal as any easy listening dross of the period, there are gems to be found, like Billie Holiday‘s “Don’t Explain,” which has a beautiful, bluesy Ernie Wilkins chart conducted by Quincy Jones. Struggling with a weight problem, Washington died of an accidental overdose of diet pills mixed with alcohol at the tragically early age of 39, still in peak voice, still singing the blues in an L.A. club only two weeks before the end.