Tag: Thoughts

Stay Strong This Week!

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Saving Faith

“And he said unto the woman, Thy faith hath saved thee; go in peace.” (Luke 7:50)

When you look at and consider what the woman (who was identified by Luke as being a sinner) endured, it makes her situation that more remarkable.  Risking objection and ridicule by those who were at Simon, the Pharisee’s house, she opened an expensive box of ointment and began to wash Jesus’ feet with her tears, dried them with her hair, and applied the ointment to them.

This selfless act of love, devotion, and worship, prompted Jesus to declare her sins forgiven, sending her off in peace.  This is what Jesus is looking for in each of us.  He’s not looking for someone to draw attention to themselves or boast about their many accomplishments.  He is looking for those who acknowledge their sins, seek after him in faith, and who, in humility, worship him with all that they have.  This is the type of faith that saves.  This is what God is looking for in each of us.  What type of faith are you expressing?

Prayer:  Father, we thank you and give you glory, honor, and praise for what you have accomplished in us through Christ our Lord.  Teach us to rely solely upon his finished work on the cross for our sins that we may enjoy life with you.  In Jesus’ name, amen.

~Joel Osteen

#SaturdayStamps: Dr. Allison Davis

A noted psychologist, educator, and author, Dr. Allison Davis (1902-83) helped raise national awareness of the civil rights issue through his books, lectures, and conferences. Graduating as valedictorian from Williams College in 1924, he went on to earn two master’s degrees from Harvard, where he directed various research projects.
In 1942, Davis received his doctorate from the University of Chicago, where he served as a faculty member for the next 40 years. A sharp critic of intelligence testing, he challenged the cultural bias of the testing system and fought for the understanding of human potential without regard to race or class.
Widely acclaimed, he received numerous awards. The University of Chicago’s John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor of Education, he was also named Educator of the Year in 1971. During the 60s, Dr. Davis served on the President’s Commission on Civil Rights and later as vice chairman of the Department of Labor’s Commission on Manpower Retraining. Dr. Davis wrote ten respected books, was one of the first African American professors to be granted tenure at a major predominantly white northern university, and served on the President’s Commission on Civil Rights—and so much more.