Tag: Reddit

#SaturdayStamps: Wilma Rudolph

Wilma Glodean Rudolph was born prematurely on June 23, 1940, in St. Bethlehem, Tennessee, the 20th of 22 children born to dad Ed across his two marriages. She went on to become a pioneering African-American track and field champion, but the road to victory was not an easy one for Wilma Rudolph. Stricken with double pneumonia, scarlet fever and polio as a child, she had problems with her left leg and had to wear a brace. It was with great determination and the help of physical therapy that she was able to overcome her disabilities.

Growing up in the segregated South, Rudolph attended the all-black Burt High School, where she played on the basketball team. A naturally gifted runner, she was soon recruited to train with Tennessee State University track coach Ed Temple.

Pioneering Olympic Medalist

Nicknamed “Skeeter” for her famous speed, Wilma Rudolph qualified for the 1956 Summer Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia. The youngest member of the U.S. track and field team at age 16, she won a bronze medal in the 400-meter relay. After finishing high school, Rudolph enrolled at Tennessee State University, where she studied education. She also trained hard for the next Olympics.

Held in Rome, Italy, the 1960 Olympic Games were a golden time for Rudolph. After tying a world record with her time of 11.3 seconds in the 100-meter semifinals, she won the event with her wind-aided mark of 11.0 seconds in the final. Similarly, Rudolph broke the Olympic record in the 200-meter dash (23.2 seconds) in the heats before claiming another gold medal with her time of 24.0 seconds. She was also part of the U.S. team that established the world record in the 400-meter relay (44.4 seconds) before going on to win gold with a time of 44.5 seconds. As a result, Rudolph became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field at a single Olympic Games. The first-class sprinter instantly became one of the most popular athletes of the Rome Games as well as an international superstar, lauded around the world for her groundbreaking achievements.

Following the Games, Rudolph made numerous appearances on television and received several honors, including the Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year Award in both 1960 and 1961. She retired from competition not long after, and went on to teach, coach and run a community center, among other endeavors, though her accomplishments on the Olympic track remained her best known.

Later Years, Death and Legacy

Rudolph shared her remarkable story with her 1977 autobiography, Wilma, which was turned into a TV film later that year. In the 1980s, she was inducted into the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame and established the Wilma Rudolph Foundation to promote amateur athletics. She died on November 12, 1994, in Brentwood, Tennessee, after losing a battle with brain cancer.

Rudolph is remembered as one of the fastest women in track and as a source of great inspiration for generations of athletes. She once stated, “Winning is great, sure, but if you are really going to do something in life, the secret is learning how to lose. Nobody goes undefeated all the time. If you can pick up after a crushing defeat, and go on to win again, you are going to be a champion someday.”

Advertisements

#FashionFriday: Tracy Reese

Tracy Reese is an American designer whose signature rich, daring colors and unique prints are crafted into joyful, feminine pieces for the modern woman. The TRACY REESE design philosophy is rooted in a commitment to bringing out the beauty in women of all shapes, sizes and colors. Stimulated by the world around her, Reese takes inspiration from nature, art, dance, travel and global cultures.

Reese attended Parsons New School for Design, where she received an accelerated degree in 1984. Upon graduation, she apprenticed under designer Martine Sitbon, while working for the small contemporary firm Arlequin. She has also worked at some of the industry’s top fashion houses- including Perry Ellis where she was design director for Women’s Portfolio.

In 1997, Reese launched her eponymous collection to rave reviews. By combining bold hues and prints with modern silhouettes and shapes, she creates fresh designs perfect for the confident, sophisticated woman.

Her secondary line, plenty by Tracy Reese, was introduced in 1998. Plenty embodies the modern bohemian spirit, offering a distinctive combination of joyful color palettes and playful details. The line is all about versatile everyday essentials with effortlessly, sexy styling.

Launched in Spring 2014, plenty DRESSES by Tracy Reese captures the needs of the contemporary dress consumer who is seeking fashion which takes her from work to a special occasion. Color, vivid prints and feminine styles have instantly made this brand a stand out.

Reese’s designs have been featured in the top fashion publications including Vogue, Elle, Glamour, InStyle, O, the Oprah Magazine, Essence and WWD. Her distinct point of view has also made her a celebrity favorite. Notable fans of the brand include First Lady Michelle Obama, Sarah Jessica Parker and Taylor Swift.

Reese serves on the CFDA Board of Directors. She is a champion for many charities and social causes—she is an advocate for HIV/AIDS charities and has served on the AIDS Fund Committee for the New York Community Trust for five years. She is also part of the Turnaround Arts program through the President’s Committee of the Humanities and Arts and is the Turnaround Artist for Barnum School in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Tracy Reese, plenty by Tracy Reese, and plenty DRESSES by Tracy Reese are sold nationwide in top department stores and specialty boutiques as well as retailers throughout Europe & Asia.

#TheologyThursday: William Pannell

“Bill” Pannell was born in Sturgis, Michigan. He gave his life to Christ during his junior year in high school, thanks to some Christian friends. The seeds to his conversion were sown many years previously in Sunday school at a local Plymouth Brethren Church. Pannell received his BA from Fort Wayne Bible College in Indiana, in 1951. He went on to study black history at Wayne State University in Detroit. In 1980 he earned an MA in Social Ethics from the University of Southern California.

Pannell has had far-ranging evangelistic experience at both the practical and the academic levels. After graduating from Fort Wayne, he became an evangelist, preaching and teaching throughout the United States. From 1955 to 1965, he served as an assistant pastor in Detroit, as well as area youth director for the Brethren Assembly youth. In 1964 he was named assistant director of leadership training with Youth for Christ, serving in that capacity until 1968, when he joined Tom Skinner Associates as associate evangelist and vice president.

He remained with that ministry until 1974, when he joined Fuller as assistant professor of evangelism and director of the Black Pastors’ Program (later the African American Church Studies Program). Before joining the faculty at Fuller, Pannell was the first African American to serve on Fuller Seminary’s Board of Trustees (1971–1974). In 1992 he was appointed as the Arthur DeKruyter/Christ Church Oak Brook Professor of Preaching, a role in which he served until 2000. He also served as dean of the chapel from 1992 to 1998. In 1993 he was selected by his faculty colleagues to receive the C. Davis Weyerhaeuser Award for Excellence.

In addition, Pannell received an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from Malone College in Ohio, an honorary Doctor of Christian Service degree from Geneva College in Pennsylvania, and an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, from Taylor University in Indiana.

Pannell has served on boards of Youth for Christ USA, which he chaired in 1980, and the Academy of Evangelism, which he served as president from 1983 to 1984. He has been an active participant in conferences on evangelism throughout the world and is a sought-after guest lecturer at Christian colleges and universities throughout the United States. He currently serves on the board of Taylor University in Indiana.

His books include My Friend, the Enemy (Word 1968), Evangelism from the Bottom Up (Zondervan 1992), and The Coming Race Wars? A Cry for Reconciliation (Zondervan 1993). His research interests include preaching and spirituality.

Pannell and his wife, Hazel, live in Altadena, California. They have two sons, Philip and Peter.

#HumpDayLoveDay: 5 Scientific Reasons Why Women Love Fat Guys

Being overweight can cause a variety of health problems for men, including heart disease, diabetes, and upping their kid’s chances of being obese. Fortunately for heterosexual guys, however, women tend to be surprisingly forgiving about the flaws of the male body, perhaps because they have fewer neurons in their visual cortexes. There’s ample evidence that women prefer a man with a little extra to hold onto.

We’re not suggesting men pack on the pounds to enhance their love lives—women can’t protect you from diabetes, so you’d best put that cookie back in the jar. But the following five scientific explanations for why women love those love handles should, at the very least boost can boost the confidence of big guys.

You’re A Product Of Evolution. Sort Of. 

“Those who could store fat easily had an evolutionary advantage in the harsh environment of early hunters and gatherers,” Garabed Eknoyan of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in a 2006. “This ability to store surplus fat from the least possible amount of food intake may have made the difference between life and death.” Indeed, in early human history weight was a status symbol—it meant that you had the resources to survive, and share with a spouse. Although modern women are more likely to be attracted to money than food, old habits die hard. It’s possible, Eknoyan writes, that traces of this instinctual attraction for fat linger, even when it doesn’t come with a penthouse.

Your Love Handles Can Handle Longer Lovemaking

Husky men are better in bed (and not just because they occasionally bring snacks) according to a survey of 2,544 British women. Thirty-eight percent reported that overweight or plus-size men were superior lovers. It’s not totally clear why extra cushion improves the pushing, but research suggests stamina might have something to do with it. Men with noticeable bellies and higher BMIs last 7.3 minutes longer in bed than slimmer men, a 2010 study from the International Journal of Impotence Research found. And that’s 7.3 minutes you don’t have to spend in the gym.

Everyone Trusts The Fat Guy

People consider heavier male politicians more trustworthy than thin ones, according to research out of the University of Missouri. This, unfortunately, explains how Chris Christie is still in office. But it also may explain why women are attracted to fat men in general—everyone wants to be with someone they trust. Of course, skinny politicians like Anthony Weiner sometimes sneak in under the radar. And everyone who trusts them pays the price…

All Fat Guys Are Funny…Right?

There’s a substantial amount of evidence that women are more attracted to men who can make them laugh. (In tribute to everything wrong with the world, it doesn’t work the other way around). While all fat men aren’t necessarily funny, pop culture has socialized most people to believe that they are until proven otherwise. This leaves overweight men with the option of either working out or working on their material. Wouldn’t want to disappoint the ladies…

Everyone Looks Thin Next To A Fat Guy
Let’s face it—for every one study that says men aren’t judged for their bodies, there’s another 10 saying that women are positively flayed for theirs. So partnering with a man who’s not obsessed with his body might make a woman feel a little more secure about her own. This, of course, on top of the literal comfort of cuddling with your cozy dad bod.

*Originally published on Fatherly.

#TuesdayArtist: Jacob Lawrence

Daybreak – A Time to Rest is one in a series of panel paintings that tell the story of Harriet Tubman, the famed African American woman who freed enslaved people using a fragile network of safe houses called the Underground Railroad. This abstracted image emphasizes Tubman’s bravery in the face of constant danger. Lying on the hard ground beside a couple and their baby, she holds a rifle. Her face, pointing upward to the sky, occupies the near center of the canvas, her body surrounded by purple. Tubman’s enormous feet, grossly out of proportion, become the focal point of the work. The lines delineating her toes and muscles look like carvings in a rock, as if to emphasize the arduous journeys she has made. Reeds in the foreground frame the prone runaways. Three insects (a walking stick, a beetle, and an ant) are signs of activity at daybreak.

Jacob Lawrence is renowned for his narrative painting series that chronicles the experiences of African Americans, which he created during a career of more than six decades. Using geometric shapes and bold colors on flattened picture planes to express his emotions, he fleshed out the lives of Tubman, Frederick Douglass, John Brown, and African Americans migrating north from the rural south during and after slavery. Lawrence was 12 in 1929 when his family settled in Harlem, New York, at a time when African American intellectual and artistic life was flourishing there. As a teen, he took classes at the Harlem Art Workshop and Harlem Community Art Center, where he studied works of art by African American artists and learned about African art and history. Lawrence went on to create images that are major expressions of the history and experience of African Americans.

#TuesdayArtist: Romare Bearden

The title of this collage could refer to several of its details. In the top right quadrant a nearly camouflaged passing train with billowing smoke travels to an unknown location. The central figure, with a cigarette dangling from his mouth, appears lost in thought. A woman stares at the viewer with a disproportionately large eye, her hand on the windowsill. In the “background” (at right), blue birds fly. These elements and others recall Romare Bearden‘s childhood in rural North Carolina and personify journeying, a central theme in African American history. The train suggests the Underground Railroad—the network of abolitionist-run safe houses that secretly transported people escaping enslavement—and the post-slavery migration of African Americans, primarily northward, to seek better lives.
Born in Charlotte, North Carolina, and raised primarily in the surrounding Mecklenburg County, Bearden eventually settled in New York City to finish college at New York University. He was a social worker there for several decades, during which time he spent nights and weekends on his art. Originally an abstract painter, Bearden began creating collages in the early 1960s using images from photo-magazines such as Life and Ebony. In addition to his unflinching, faceted images of black life, Bearden is remembered for his published books on art and aesthetics and for his political energy on behalf of black culture.