Tag: Motivation

Wait For It

“For ye have need of patience, that, after ye have done the will of God, ye might receive the promise.” (Hebrews 10:36)

One of the biggest reasons so many of us have hardships, financial problems, relationship problems, and so many other difficult times in our lives is our lack of patience.  The person who feels they have to have things right away instead of waiting patiently for them, soon finds themselves in a financial bind.  Bills aren’t paid, and very soon, that person begins to have other problems related to their lack of patience.  Their health begins to suffer from the stress of bill collectors constantly calling.  Their relationships become strained because of their indebtedness.  All of these issues arise because of a lack of patience.

For each of us, God desires that we do well and prosper.  However, to get to that place of prosperity and peace we must have patience.  God has a great reward in store for us if we remain patient and steadfast in our pursuits.  We need to let patience work its perfect work in our lives.  Our peace and stability depend heavily upon our waiting for what we desire.

Prayer:  Father, as we seek to fulfill the plan and purpose you have for our lives, teach us to wait patiently for those things that we desire.  In Jesus’ name, amen.

#FitnessFriday: PowerHouse Sports Academy

PowerHouse Sports Academy is a Fitness Company established on January 31,2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. In their short existence, they have been extremely successful in changing the lives of many by the way of fitness and proper nutrition. Because of their success they have been able to expand to three locations throughout the Atlanta, GA area (Tucker, Midtown, and Decatur). Regardless of the fitness goals that any client has required of the PowerHouse Trainers they have been successful in helping clients reach and succeed their fitness goals promoting a healthier lifestyle for many and also upcoming generations. We will love for you to join us and our family as we continue to strive to not only change lives in Atlanta, Georgia but lives across the world.

#HumpDayLoveDay: Tamia + Grant Hill

Last year, sensational singer Tamia and former NBA star Grant Hill celebrated their 20th year of marriage.

Tamia is a six-time Grammy nominee, who has received numerous awards including a Soul Train Music Award, and a NAACP Image Award. Grant Hill, her husband, was the third NBA draft pick in 1994, and became a top NBA player who played with the Detroit Pistons, Orlando Magic, and LA Clippers.

The two were introduced to each other in the 1990’s by R&B star Anita Baker. They married in 1999, and have two beautiful daughters Myla Grace, and Lael Rose.

In 2003, Tamia was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis but turned her experience into an opportunity to speak on behalf of others– by becoming an advocate for The National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

In an Instagram post, Grant Hill posted a picture of the couple and shared with his followers that, “Seriously, I’m truly amazed and inspired by how far we’ve come; humbled by how far we have left to go; and beyond grateful to be on this journey with you…”

#MedicMondays: Dr. Vivien Thomas

With no formal medical training, he developed techniques and tools that would lead to today’s modern heart surgery. In operating rooms all over the world, great surgeons who received their training from Vivien Thomas are performing life-saving surgical procedures. We honor his legacy with the naming of the Vivien Thomas High School Research Program at the Morehouse School of Medicine. The Vivien Thomas Research Program for high school students was established to provide experiences in the research laboratories at the Morehouse School of Medicine. Students conduct research for six weeks under the direction of a medical school faculty member and learn the content, process and methodology involved in inquiry science. At the end of this summer experience, students present their research findings to the faculty and staff at MSM.

Vivien T. Thomas was born in New Iberia, Louisiana on August 29, 1910. His family later moved to Nashville, Tennessee, where he was educated in the public schools. In 1929, after working as an orderly in a private infirmary to raise money for college, he enrolled as a premedical student at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial College. The bank crash that year wiped out his life’s savings, forcing him to drop out of school.

In 1930, he took a position at Vanderbilt University as a laboratory assistant with Alfred Blalock. Thomas’ abilities as a surgical assistant and research associate were of the highest quality, and when Blalock moved to Johns Hopkins in 1941 he asked Thomas to accompany him. Thomas joined Blalock’s surgical team and helped to develop the procedure used in the “blue baby” operation. He helped train many of the surgeons at Johns Hopkins in the delicate techniques necessary for heart and lung operations.

Thomas was a member of the medical school faculty from 1976 until 1985 and was presented with the degree of Honorary Doctor of Laws by the Johns Hopkins University in 1976. Today, in operating rooms all over the world, there are great surgeons performing life saving surgical procedures who received their training from Vivien Thomas. His achievements stand as a testament to the power of research, discovery, and persistence to improve the health of generations to come, a legacy we honor with the naming of the Vivien Thomas High Summer Research Program at Morehouse School of Medicine.

He’ll Restore The Years

Sometimes we look back at our lives and experiences and view it as time wasted.
We look at the degree we earned but never really used, the relationships that didn’t last, the activities and hobbies we engaged in while growing up which we’ve laid down or stop doing years ago.
Some even sigh with hopes of doing it all over again while making more productive use of their time next time.
For today’s daily devotional I’d like to encourage you with a popular saying, “Preparation time is never lost time.”
God will use all that He’s given you, all of your talents, all of your skills, one day if you just remain pliable and receive instruction from Him as far as what He would have you to do with your life.
He gave you those skills for a reason; it’s all in preparation for your future.
God doesn’t waste anything.
Even Jesus told His disciples, after He fed over 5,000 people with five loaves of bread and two fishes to pick up the fragments of food left behind as to not waste it. (John 6:1-13)
In regards to previous relationships, like I always say instead of just coming out of a relationship, learn out of a relationship.
Time spent in previous relationships that went sour now brings you one step closer to knowing what it is you’re really looking for and how you should respond in your next relationship. If nothing else, it may have taught you to seek God every step of the way and pray everything through while guarding your heart.
So no, you did not waste your time and no, you have not wasted your life away.
The God we serve is a God of a second, third, fourth and fifth chance and He will restore that which was lost as you continue to abide in His presence and allow Him to prepare you for the future He has for you.
And I will restore to you the years that the locust hath eaten, the cankerworm, and the caterpiller, and the palmerworm, my great army which I sent among you.
And ye shall eat in plenty, and be satisfied, and praise the name of the LORD your God, that hath dealt wondrously with you: and my people shall never be ashamed. Joel 2:25:26
*Originally published on Kim on the Web.

#HumpDayLoveDay: Reverend Run+ Justine Simmons

o the world, Joseph “Rev Run” Simmons, co-founder of Run DMC, is a legendary rapper but to his wife Justine from Hempstead, he’s simply “Joey.” In their new book, “Old School Love” they both talk about their successful marriage of 25 years which includes seven children (three from Run’s previous marriage) and three grandchildren.

Today they live in New Jersey, but they’ll head out to Long Island for a signing at Book Revue in Huntington on Thursday.

Newsday spoke with the couple about how they met, the secrets to surviving stardom and how they’ve made their marriage last.

Where did you two meet?

Rev Run: Justine went to see Kurtis Blow in concert when I was 15. I was hanging out doing a little rapping on the side calling myself the Son of Kurtis Blow.

Justine: He looked so innocent, shy and cute. After he got off the stage they whisked him to the back, but I kept thinking about him. So I knocked on the stage door and he came out to sign an autograph.

You both reconnected then married in 1994. What has held you together for such a long time? 

Rev Run: Doing right by each other. If you are not selfish, you can make it work. We always say, be selfless instead of selfish.

Justine: We are constantly trying to make each other happy and look out for each other. I don’t want to see him sad and he doesn’t want to see me sad. We are always trying to make our relationship better.

The divorce rate is so high these days. What are some key tips you can give young couples about staying together?

Rev Run: Whatever you were doing that got you so excited to get married, don’t change those patterns. If you’ve been together for two years and now you are married, don’t start putting new rules in the game. Whatever made you say, “I do!,” stay right there. Don’t let the word “marriage” change the way you treat your significant other.

Do you think young people today are fearful of getting married?

Justine: Yes! That’s why we called the book “Old School Love.” The back-in-the-day love was more intense. People tried to keep it together and not break up as fast. We are not saying we are the “It Couple.” We say, here are some things that we do and hopefully it will work for you.

Run, being a rap icon, how do you stay grounded?

Rev Run: They come with me. When I’m in it, I make sure they enjoy it as well. Think about it, I took the whole family and put them on TV with me [MTV’s reality show, “Run’s House,” from 2005-2009]. They are stars in their own right. My daughter Angela has three times the amount of Instagram followers than me!

#TuesdayTalk Politics: Andrew Young

Andrew Young Jr. became active in the civil rights movement, working with Martin Luther King Jr. in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Entering politics, Young served in Congress, was the first African American ambassador to the United Nations and became mayor of Atlanta. In 1981, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Early Life

On March 12, 1932, Andrew Jackson Young Jr. was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. The product of a middle-class family — his father was a dentist, his mother a teacher — he had to travel from his neighborhood to attend segregated schools. After graduating from Howard University, Young chose to study at Connecticut’s Hartford Theological Seminary. In 1955, he became an ordained minister.

Civil Rights Leader

Working as a pastor in Georgia, Young first became part of the civil rights movement when he organized voter registration drives. He moved to New York City to work with the National Council of Churches in 1957, then returned to Georgia in 1961 to help lead the “citizenship schools” that tutored African Americans in literacy, organizing and leadership skills. Though the schools were a success, Young sometimes had trouble connecting with the rural students in the program.

As the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was running the citizenship school program, Young became a member of the organization and began working closely with King. Within the SCLC, Young coordinated desegregation efforts throughout the South, including the May 3, 1963 march against segregation during which participants were attacked by police dogs. King valued Young’s work, trusting Young to oversee the SCLC when protests meant that King had to spend time behind bars.

In 1964, Young became the SCLC’s executive director. While in this position, he helped draw up the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. He was with King in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968, the day of King’s assassination. Following King’s death, Young became executive vice president of the SCLC.

Political Career

In 1970, Young left the SCLC to make a run for Congress but was defeated at the polls. Two years later, he ran again, and this time was elected to the House of Representatives. Young was the first African American to represent Georgia in Congress since Reconstruction. In his time as a legislator, he supported programs for the poor, educational initiatives and human rights.

During Jimmy Carter’s run for the presidency, Young offered key political support; when Carter was in office, he chose Young to be the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Young left his seat in Congress to take the position. While ambassador, he advocated for human rights on a global scale, such as sanctions to oppose rule by apartheid in South Africa.

In 1979, Young had to resign his ambassadorship, as he had met in secret with Zehdi Labib Terzi, the Palestinian Liberation Organization’s U.N. observer. The resignation did not keep Young from being elected as Atlanta’s mayor in 1981. After two terms as mayor, he failed in his attempt to secure the Democratic nomination to run for governor of Georgia. However, Young was successful in his campaign for Atlanta to host the Olympic Games in 1996.

Legacy

Young wrote about his role in the fight for civil rights in two books: A Way Out of No Way (1994) and An Easy Burden: The Civil Rights Movement and the Transformation of America (1996). He has also written Walk in My Shoes: Conversations Between a Civil Rights Legend and His Godson on the Journey Ahead (2010). He continues to fight for equality and economic justice with a consulting firm, Good Works International, that supports development initiatives, particularly in Africa and the Caribbean.

As an esteemed civil rights activist, Young has received accolades that include the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s Spingarn Medal. Morehouse College named the Andrew Young Center for Global Leadership in his honor, and Young has taught at Georgia State University’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies.