Tag: lifestyle

He’ll Restore The Years

Sometimes we look back at our lives and experiences and view it as time wasted.
We look at the degree we earned but never really used, the relationships that didn’t last, the activities and hobbies we engaged in while growing up which we’ve laid down or stop doing years ago.
Some even sigh with hopes of doing it all over again while making more productive use of their time next time.
For today’s daily devotional I’d like to encourage you with a popular saying, “Preparation time is never lost time.”
God will use all that He’s given you, all of your talents, all of your skills, one day if you just remain pliable and receive instruction from Him as far as what He would have you to do with your life.
He gave you those skills for a reason; it’s all in preparation for your future.
God doesn’t waste anything.
Even Jesus told His disciples, after He fed over 5,000 people with five loaves of bread and two fishes to pick up the fragments of food left behind as to not waste it. (John 6:1-13)
In regards to previous relationships, like I always say instead of just coming out of a relationship, learn out of a relationship.
Time spent in previous relationships that went sour now brings you one step closer to knowing what it is you’re really looking for and how you should respond in your next relationship. If nothing else, it may have taught you to seek God every step of the way and pray everything through while guarding your heart.
So no, you did not waste your time and no, you have not wasted your life away.
The God we serve is a God of a second, third, fourth and fifth chance and He will restore that which was lost as you continue to abide in His presence and allow Him to prepare you for the future He has for you.
And I will restore to you the years that the locust hath eaten, the cankerworm, and the caterpiller, and the palmerworm, my great army which I sent among you.
And ye shall eat in plenty, and be satisfied, and praise the name of the LORD your God, that hath dealt wondrously with you: and my people shall never be ashamed. Joel 2:25:26
*Originally published on Kim on the Web.

#HumpDayLoveDay: Reverend Run+ Justine Simmons

o the world, Joseph “Rev Run” Simmons, co-founder of Run DMC, is a legendary rapper but to his wife Justine from Hempstead, he’s simply “Joey.” In their new book, “Old School Love” they both talk about their successful marriage of 25 years which includes seven children (three from Run’s previous marriage) and three grandchildren.

Today they live in New Jersey, but they’ll head out to Long Island for a signing at Book Revue in Huntington on Thursday.

Newsday spoke with the couple about how they met, the secrets to surviving stardom and how they’ve made their marriage last.

Where did you two meet?

Rev Run: Justine went to see Kurtis Blow in concert when I was 15. I was hanging out doing a little rapping on the side calling myself the Son of Kurtis Blow.

Justine: He looked so innocent, shy and cute. After he got off the stage they whisked him to the back, but I kept thinking about him. So I knocked on the stage door and he came out to sign an autograph.

You both reconnected then married in 1994. What has held you together for such a long time? 

Rev Run: Doing right by each other. If you are not selfish, you can make it work. We always say, be selfless instead of selfish.

Justine: We are constantly trying to make each other happy and look out for each other. I don’t want to see him sad and he doesn’t want to see me sad. We are always trying to make our relationship better.

The divorce rate is so high these days. What are some key tips you can give young couples about staying together?

Rev Run: Whatever you were doing that got you so excited to get married, don’t change those patterns. If you’ve been together for two years and now you are married, don’t start putting new rules in the game. Whatever made you say, “I do!,” stay right there. Don’t let the word “marriage” change the way you treat your significant other.

Do you think young people today are fearful of getting married?

Justine: Yes! That’s why we called the book “Old School Love.” The back-in-the-day love was more intense. People tried to keep it together and not break up as fast. We are not saying we are the “It Couple.” We say, here are some things that we do and hopefully it will work for you.

Run, being a rap icon, how do you stay grounded?

Rev Run: They come with me. When I’m in it, I make sure they enjoy it as well. Think about it, I took the whole family and put them on TV with me [MTV’s reality show, “Run’s House,” from 2005-2009]. They are stars in their own right. My daughter Angela has three times the amount of Instagram followers than me!

#TuesdayTalk Politics: Andrew Young

Andrew Young Jr. became active in the civil rights movement, working with Martin Luther King Jr. in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Entering politics, Young served in Congress, was the first African American ambassador to the United Nations and became mayor of Atlanta. In 1981, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Early Life

On March 12, 1932, Andrew Jackson Young Jr. was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. The product of a middle-class family — his father was a dentist, his mother a teacher — he had to travel from his neighborhood to attend segregated schools. After graduating from Howard University, Young chose to study at Connecticut’s Hartford Theological Seminary. In 1955, he became an ordained minister.

Civil Rights Leader

Working as a pastor in Georgia, Young first became part of the civil rights movement when he organized voter registration drives. He moved to New York City to work with the National Council of Churches in 1957, then returned to Georgia in 1961 to help lead the “citizenship schools” that tutored African Americans in literacy, organizing and leadership skills. Though the schools were a success, Young sometimes had trouble connecting with the rural students in the program.

As the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was running the citizenship school program, Young became a member of the organization and began working closely with King. Within the SCLC, Young coordinated desegregation efforts throughout the South, including the May 3, 1963 march against segregation during which participants were attacked by police dogs. King valued Young’s work, trusting Young to oversee the SCLC when protests meant that King had to spend time behind bars.

In 1964, Young became the SCLC’s executive director. While in this position, he helped draw up the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. He was with King in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968, the day of King’s assassination. Following King’s death, Young became executive vice president of the SCLC.

Political Career

In 1970, Young left the SCLC to make a run for Congress but was defeated at the polls. Two years later, he ran again, and this time was elected to the House of Representatives. Young was the first African American to represent Georgia in Congress since Reconstruction. In his time as a legislator, he supported programs for the poor, educational initiatives and human rights.

During Jimmy Carter’s run for the presidency, Young offered key political support; when Carter was in office, he chose Young to be the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Young left his seat in Congress to take the position. While ambassador, he advocated for human rights on a global scale, such as sanctions to oppose rule by apartheid in South Africa.

In 1979, Young had to resign his ambassadorship, as he had met in secret with Zehdi Labib Terzi, the Palestinian Liberation Organization’s U.N. observer. The resignation did not keep Young from being elected as Atlanta’s mayor in 1981. After two terms as mayor, he failed in his attempt to secure the Democratic nomination to run for governor of Georgia. However, Young was successful in his campaign for Atlanta to host the Olympic Games in 1996.

Legacy

Young wrote about his role in the fight for civil rights in two books: A Way Out of No Way (1994) and An Easy Burden: The Civil Rights Movement and the Transformation of America (1996). He has also written Walk in My Shoes: Conversations Between a Civil Rights Legend and His Godson on the Journey Ahead (2010). He continues to fight for equality and economic justice with a consulting firm, Good Works International, that supports development initiatives, particularly in Africa and the Caribbean.

As an esteemed civil rights activist, Young has received accolades that include the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s Spingarn Medal. Morehouse College named the Andrew Young Center for Global Leadership in his honor, and Young has taught at Georgia State University’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies.

 

#MedicMonday: Patricia Bath

Who Was Patricia Bath?

Patricia Bath was the first African American to complete a residency in ophthalmology in 1973. Two years later, she became the first female faculty member in the Department of Ophthalmology at UCLA’s Jules Stein Eye Institute. In 1976, Bath co-founded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness, which established that “eyesight is a basic human right.” In 1986, Bath invented the Laserphaco Probe, improving treatment for cataract patients. She patented the device in 1988, becoming the first African American female doctor to receive a medical patent.

Early Life

Bath was born on November 4, 1942, in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood to Rupert Bath, the first black motorman for the New York City subway system, and Gladys Bath, a housewife and domestic worker who used her salary to save money for her children’s education. Bath was encouraged by her family to pursue academic interests. Her father, a former Merchant Marine and an occasional newspaper columnist, taught Bath about the wonders of travel and the value of exploring new cultures. Her mother piqued the young girl’s interest in science by buying her a chemistry set.

As a result, Bath worked hard on her intellectual pursuits and, at the age of 16, became one of only a few students to attend a cancer research workshop sponsored by the National Science Foundation. The program head, Dr. Robert Bernard, was so impressed with Bath’s discoveries during the project that he incorporated her findings in a scientific paper he presented at a conference. The publicity surrounding her discoveries earned Bath the Mademoiselle magazine’s Merit Award in 1960.

After graduating from high school in only two years, Bath headed to Hunter College, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in 1964. She then attended Howard University to pursue a medical degree. Bath graduated with honors from Howard in 1968, and accepted an internship at Harlem Hospital shortly afterward. The following year, she also began pursuing a fellowship in ophthalmology at Columbia University. Through her studies there, she discovered that African Americans were twice as likely to suffer from blindness than other patients to which she attended, and eight times more likely to develop glaucoma. Her research led to her development of a community ophthalmology system, which increased the amount of eye care given to those who were unable to afford treatment.

Pioneer in Ophthalmology

In 1973, Bath became the first African American to complete a residency in ophthalmology. She moved to California the following year to work as an assistant professor of surgery at both Charles R. Drew University and the University of California, Los Angeles. In 1975, she became the first female faculty member in the Department of Ophthalmology at UCLA’s Jules Stein Eye Institute.

In 1976, Bath co-founded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness, which established that “eyesight is a basic human right.” By 1983, Bath had helped create the Ophthalmology Residency Training program at UCLA-Drew, which she also chaired—becoming, in addition to her other firsts, the first woman in the nation to hold such a position.

Inventing the Laserphaco Probe

In 1981, Bath began working on her most well-known invention: the Laserphaco Probe (1986). Harnessing laser technology, the device created a less painful and more precise treatment of cataracts. She received a patent for the device in 1988, becoming the first African American female doctor to receive a patent for a medical purpose. She also holds patents in Japan, Canada and Europe. With her Laserphaco Probe, Bath was able to help restore the sight of individuals who had been blind for more than 30 years.

In 1993, Bath retired from her position at the UCLA Medical Center and became an honorary member of its medical staff. That same year, she was named a “Howard University Pioneer in Academic Medicine.”

Among her many roles in the medical field, Bath was a strong advocate of telemedicine, which uses technology to provide medical services in remote areas.

Bath died on May 30, 2019, in San Francisco, California.

Stayed On Him

“You will keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on You, because he trusts in You.” (Isaiah 26:3, NKJV)
 
If you’ll acknowledge God in all you do, He promises to go before you and make the crooked places straight. That means He will cause the right people to show up. He will open doors that you could not open. He will crown your efforts with success.
 
Acknowledging God isn’t something we should just do every once in a while. He should always be on your mind. Think about two people when they are first dating. They are so enthralled with one another that no matter what they are doing, they are thinking about the other person. Well, that’s how we should be with God. First thing in the morning when you wake up, you should acknowledge Him, while you’re getting ready, while you’re driving, and all throughout the day. Don’t let the distractions of this temporary world take your focus. Be determined to make your relationship with the Father your highest priority. Keep your mind stayed on Him, and He will direct your steps!
 
A PRAYER FOR TODAY
Father, thank You for the gift of today. I choose to keep my heart and mind stayed on You. Help me to stand strong against distractions and negative voices so I can hear You clearly and follow Your ways in Jesus’ name. Amen.
— Joel & Victoria Osteen

#FitnessFridays: Jeanette Jenkins

Jeanette Jenkins is one of Hollywood’s most sought after Healthy Living Coaches with over 28years of experience, founder and President of The Hollywood Trainer LLC.  www.TheHollywoodTrainer.com  author of The Hollywood Trainer Weight-Loss Plan and creator of “The Hollywood Trainer Club”  www.TheHollywoodTrainerClub.com a Virtual Online Healthy Living & Weight Loss Club with everything you need to lose weight, get in shape & make healthy living a lifetime habit!  She is the creator of the internationally successful Hollywood Trainer DVD Collection with 18 DVD’s sold worldwide in 14 different countries and online and on her downloadable platform including Bikini Bootcamp, Power Yoga and CardioKickboxing.

Jeanette motivates millions of people daily through her social media platforms on Instagram @MsJeanetteJenkins, Facebook @MsJeanetteJenkins and Youtube workouts on PopSugar Fitness, App Workouts on Aaptiv & FitOn and through her online Club www.TheHollywoodTrainerClub.com with over 500+ Streaming Workouts and Challenges, over 150+ Healthy Recipes, Meal Plans, Community Support & Daily Motivation.

New for 2019 Jeanette has collaborated with Apple Inc. the world’s largest tech company to offer a Today at Apple “Health & Fitness Walk” with Jay Blahnik the senior director of health & fitness Technologies for Apple which is offered as a session globally in all Apple stores.

Her List of Celebrity clientele past and present is extensive and includes P!nk, Alicia Keys, Bebe Rexha, Mindy Kaling, Shonda Rhimes, Octavia Spencer, Simone Smith, Mara Brock Akil, Tia Mowry, Tracee Ellis Ross, Nia Long, Amber Rose, Kelly Rowland, Serena Williams, Terrence Jenkins, NBA Champion Chris Bosh, NFL Champion Bryant Mckinnie, Olympic Gold Medal Gymnast Shawn Johnson, Olympic Gold Medal Sprinter Carmelita Jeter and many more. 

She studied Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa and has earned over 18 international certifications covering nutrition and various methods of training. She is a graduate of the Institute of Integrative Nutrition recognized by the American Association of Drugless Practitioners and Columbia University. 

Jeanette was born in Hollywood California and her parents divorced when she was 5 and was then raised in public housing in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada with her brother Roger and sister Camille. Jenkins was raised by a single mother and fitness is what kept her focused. A natural athlete, Jeanette found a safe haven in sports, one that taught her the value of discipline and team work, and most importantly instilled self confidence and a “can do” attitude. 

Jeanette benefited from social and community services as a child and dedicates her time and support to several non-profit organizations including The Boys & Girls Clubs of America, No Kid Hungry, School on Wheels, The Samburu Project,  Keep A Child Alive, Pretty Girls Sweat, Wome

n’s Sports Foundation, UNICEF and many more. Jeanette teamed up with one of her clients P!nk and UNICEF as the UNICEF Kid Power Coach to help promote UNICEF KID POWER which gets kids in the U.S. more active to save the lives of children who are malnourished around the world. Jeanette also rode 100miles on bike with P!nk to raise money and awareness for No Kid Hungry. In 2016 Jeanette ran the NYC Marathon to raise funds for “Keep A Child Alive” a non-profit organization co-founded by her client Alicia Keys to provide health care, medicine and support to children and families affected by HIV.  Most importantly Jeanette’s mission is to help everyone find the athlete inside them and enjoy the amazing benefits of healthy living!