Tag: Inspiration

Still Believe

What Word have you let slip so far this year?

Or even prior to that, have you given up hope on the promises of God for you, whether it was last year or previous years – have you grown complacent and taken on the mantra, “It is what it is.”

Have you grown to accept “business as usual” and stopped expecting the unexpected in your life?

This reminds me of the story of Mary.  Mary was a woman of God who received a message from an angel of God- she was to give birth to a Son, Jesus Christ, though she was a virgin.  She couldn’t see how it could happen at first, then she just accepted the proclamation as she stated, “Be it unto me, according to thy Word” (Luke 1:38)

However, in the meantime and in between time, she got pregnant and had to carry Jesus to full term and give birth to Him – all in faith.  At any moment she could have chosen not to believe; she could’ve said, “Me, pregnant? How could that be? I don’t think so!” Yet she still chose to remain steadfast and unmovable, believing God’s Word from the messenger of God to be true.

In the same manner, what Word has God spoken to you about? Has God told you years ago that you will be married one day, yet you haven’t seen the manifestation yet?

I’d just like to encourage you, in spite of how long it’s been, to hold on to God’s Word, and hold on to your faith. Don’t let it slip, get back on top of things when it comes to reading God’s Word and believing it to be true for you.

As Mary has learned and as you know – with God all things are possible. (Matthew 19:26) Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard, lest at any time we should let them slip.  (Hebrews 2:1) So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God. (Romans 10:17)

*Originally posted on Kim on the Web.

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#SaturdayStamps: Charles W. Chestnutt

Charles W. Chestnutt was born June 20, 1858 and died November 15, 1932 in Cleveland, OH.

Chesnutt was the son of free blacks who had left their native city of Fayetteville, N.C., prior to the American Civil War. Following the war his parents moved back to Fayetteville, where Chesnutt completed his education and began teaching. He was named assistant principal (1877–80) and then principal (1880–83) of State Colored Normal School (now Fayetteville State University), but he became so distressed about the treatment of blacks in the South that he moved his wife and children to Cleveland. He worked as a clerk-stenographer while becoming a practicing attorney and establishing a profitable legal stenography firm. In his spare moments he wrote stories.

Between 1885 and 1905 Chesnutt published more than 50 tales, short stories, and essays, as well as two collections of short stories, a biography of the antislavery leader Frederick Douglass, and three novels. His “The Goophered Grapevine,” the first work by a black accepted by The Atlantic Monthly (August 1887), was so subtle in its refutation of the plantation school of Thomas Nelson Page that most readers missed the irony. This and similarly authentic stories of folk life among the North Carolina blacks were collected in The Conjure Woman (1899). The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories of the Color Line (1899) examines colour prejudice among blacks as well as between the races in a manner reminiscent of George W. Cable. The Colonel’s Dream (1905) dealt trenchantly with problems of the freed slave. A psychological realist, Chesnutt made use of familiar scenes of North Carolina folk life to protest social injustice.

His works outranked any fiction written by blacks until the 1930s. Chesnutt’s thematic use of the humanity of blacks and the contemporary inhumanity of man to man, black and white alike, anticipates the work of later writers as diverse as William Faulkner, Richard Wright, and James Baldwin.

Don’t Give Them A Voice

I feel ugly

I’m depressed

I just don’t feel it

I’m not good enough

Nobody wants me

Life is too hard

It’s not worth it

I have nothing to look forward to

God hates me

I’m fat

It’ll never happen for me

I’ll never get any better

Life is so unfair

I can’t

What’s the point?

I.Just.Can’t.

I can’t help it

I’m getting old

I am too old

No one cares about me

It’ll never happen for me

Examine Your Relationships This Year

There is a saying, you can’t pick your family but you can pick your friends.
An ideal, healthy friendship relationship, whether it’s with your girlfriend or a male platonic friend, is one that, as the Word calls it, iron sharpens iron.
Proverbs 27:17 reads, Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend. Sharpen means to be or make sharp and the word, countenance, means face, favor, or presence.
You want those in your presence, whether they’re close friends or acquaintances, to sharpen you, keep you on your toes, and you do the same for them.  You don’t need people around you who simply agree with you all the time.
You need people who, when trouble comes, they can speak a Word to you in due season, encourage you when you’re down, and help you see how through God’s Word and God’s love you can press on.
Examine your relationships and see which should stay and which should go away, then act accordingly.  As the saying goes, some people are in your life for a reason, for a season, or for a lifetime.
Pray about which category your friends fall, then pray and ask God how to proceed.

*Originally published on Kim on the Web.

#SaturdayStamps: Clifton R. Wharton Sr.

Clifton Wharton earned a master of law degree from Boston University School of Law in 1923 and joined the Department of State as a law clerk. His diplomatic career stretched across nearly four decades of distinguished service.

In 1925, Wharton became the first African American to enter the Foreign Service after the passage of the 1924 Rogers Act, which consolidated the Department’s Consular and Diplomatic Services. He would be the only African American admitted to the Foreign Service for the next 20 years.

Wharton held various posts at embassies and consulates around the world—Liberia, the Canary Islands, Madagascar, the Azores, and Portugal. In 1953, he became consul general in Marseilles, France. Five years later, President Dwight Eisenhower named him minister to Romania, making him the first black career diplomat to head a U.S. mission in a European country. At the time, U.S. diplomatic relations with Romania were strained. The United States demanded reparations for damage done during the Communist takeover and froze Romanian assets in American banks. Romania accused the United States of espionage. By 1960, Wharton had helped negotiate a settlement. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy appointed him Ambassador to Norway. Wharton was the first African American career Foreign Service officer to become an Ambassador. In May 2006 the U.S. Postal Service issued a stamp to honor his service.

#TheologyThursday: James Cone

Professor James H. Cone, known as the founder of black liberation theology, was the Bill and Judith Moyers Distinguished Professor of Systematic Theology at Union Theological Seminary. He attended Shorter College (1954-56) and held a B.A. degree from Philander Smith College (1958). In 1961, he received a Master of Divinity degree from Garrett Theological Seminary and later earned an M.A. (1963) and Ph.D. (1965) from Northwestern University. Dr. Cone was conferred thirteen (13) honorary degrees, including an honoris causa from the Institut Protestant de Théologie in Paris, France.

Among his numerous awards were the American Black Achievement Award in religion given by Ebony Magazine (November 1992), the Fund for Theological Education Award for contributions to theological education and scholarship (November 1999), the Martin E. Marty Award for the Public Understanding of Religion (2009), the Eliza Garrett Distinguished Service Award in recognition of seminal theological scholarship from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary (2010).

Dr. Cone was an ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. He is listed in the Directory of American Scholars, in Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in American Religion, Who’s Who among African Americans, and Who’s Who in the World. He was the author of twelve (12) books and over 150 articles and lectured at many universities and community organizations throughout the United States, Europe, Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. He was an active member of numerous professional societies, including the Society for the Study of Black Religion, the American Academy of Religion, and the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians (EATWOT) in the Philippines, and was a founding member of the Society of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion (SRER).

Dr. Cone was best known for his ground-breaking works, Black Theology & Black Power (1969) and A Black Theology of Liberation (1970); he was also the author of the highly acclaimed God of the Oppressed (1975), and of Martin & Malcolm & America: A Dream or a Nightmare? (1991); all of which works have been translated into nine languages.  The 30th Anniversary of the publication of Black Theology & Black Power was celebrated at the University of Chicago Divinity School (April 1998), and a similar event was held for A Black Theology of Liberation at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary (April 2000) and at the Catholic Theological Society of America (June 2001). His research and teaching were in Christian theology, with special attention to black liberation theology and the liberation theologies of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.  He also taught 19th & 20th century European-American theologies. His 2012 book, The Cross and the Lynching Tree, received the 2012 Nautilus Silver Award in Religion/Spirituality-Western Traditions. It was an Amazon.com #1 best seller in religion in February 2012. Naming it one of the top religion books of 2011, Huffington Post editors said: “One of the great theologians of the late 20th century, Cone forces us to look hard at suffering, oppression and, ultimately, redemption.”

Dr. Cone passed in 2018.