Tag: Inspiration

Chocolate Vent’s Question of the Day – When did you realize you weren’t special?

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Everlasting Love

Have you ever been in a relationship and your boyfriend at the time wrote you a love letter?  Or, have you ever had a secret crush and you received a greeting card and nice note detailing his
adoration for you? If so, you probably scrutinized each word, took in every compliment and were sincerely flattered by the gesture, even if the feelings weren’t mutual.

Even if you’ve never received a love letter from an ex, I want to remind you that you actually have been given a love letter by someone, and that’s God. God loves you so much in that not only did He send His only begotten Son, Jesus, to die in your place for your sins (Isaiah 53:10)…not only did God send us the Holy Spirit to live inside of us and guide us after Jesus ascended back to heaven (John 14:16)…God made sure you are constantly reminded of His love and adoration for you as He inspired men to pen the pages of The Bible (2 Timothy 3:16) – so you’ll always know that you’re loved.

Never take for granted God’s love for you. Constantly remind yourself by reading parts of His  Love Letter to you each day.  God loves you with an unconditional, everlasting love that will never leave you nor forsake you (Hebrews 13:5). Not only that, He loves you so much that He has committed to spend the rest your life with you, including the afterlife – He wants to spend eternity with you. There is no greater love than the love of Jesus.  He is the greatest love of all.

The LORD hath appeared of old unto me, saying, Yea, I have loved thee with an everlasting love: therefore with loving kindness have I drawn thee.  Jeremiah 31:3

*Originally posted on Kim on the Web.

#SaturdayStamps: Anna Julia Cooper

Anna Julia Cooper, née Anna Julia Haywood was born August 10, 1858 in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. and died February 27, 1964 in Washington, D.C. was an American educator and writer whose book A Voice From the South by a Black Woman of the South became a classic African American feminist text.

Cooper was the daughter of a slave woman and her white slaveholder (or his brother). In 1868 she enrolled in the newly established Saint Augustine’s Normal School and Collegiate Institute (now Saint Augustine’s University), a school for freed slaves. She quickly distinguished herself as an excellent student, and, in addition to her studies, she began teaching mathematics part-time at age 10. While enrolled at Saint Augustine’s, she had a feminist awakening when she realized that her male classmates were encouraged to study a more rigorous curriculum than were the female students. After that early realization, she spent the rest of her life advocating for the education of black women.

In 1877 Anna married her classmate George Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband’s death, Cooper enrolled in Oberlin College in Ohio, graduating in 1884 with a B.S. in mathematics and receiving a master’s degree in mathematics in 1888. In 1887 she became a faculty member at the M Street High School (established in 1870 as the Preparatory High School for Negro Youth) in Washington, D.C. There she taught mathematics, science, and, later, Latin.

During the 1890s Cooper became involved in the black women’s club movement. Women’s club members were generally educated middle-class women who believed that it was their duty to help less-fortunate African Americans. During that time Cooper became a popular public speaker. She addressed a wide variety of groups, including the National Conference of Colored Women in 1895 and the first Pan-African Conference in 1900.

In 1902 Cooper was named principal of the M Street High School. As principal, she enhanced the academic reputation of the school, and under her tenure several M Street graduates were admitted to Ivy League schools. Cooper’s controversial emphasis on college preparatory courses irked critics (such as Booker T. Washington) who favoured vocational education for blacks. Using trumped-up charges, the District of Columbia Board of Education refused to renew her contract for the 1905–06 school year. Undaunted, Cooper continued her career as an educator, teaching for four years at Lincoln University, a historically black college in Jefferson City, Missouri. In 1910 she was rehired as a teacher at M Street (renamed Dunbar High School after 1916), where she stayed until 1930.

In 1911 Cooper began studying part-time for a doctoral degree. In 1925, at age 67, she received a doctorate from the Sorbonne in Paris, having written her dissertation on slavery. Written in French, it was published in English as Slavery and the French Revolutionists, 1788–1805.

In addition to her scholarly activities, Cooper reared two foster children and five adoptive children on a teacher’s salary. From 1930 to 1941 she served as president of the Frelinghuysen University for working adults in Washington, D.C. She died in her sleep at age 105.

“I Love You, But My Thumbs Are Tired”

Guys, you gotta stop texting me when I ask you to call me instead! Why is that such a hard instruction to follow? As nice as it is to hear from you in the middle of the day, texting should not be the primary method of communication, especially when you are just getting to know me.

If when I met you, I specifically asked you NOT to text me & you proceed to text me then I automatically know you aren’t good at following directions. I’ve even had men text me, “I know you asked me not to text you, but…. ” SO WHY ARE YOU TEXTING ME THEN??! This is an instant turnoff, guys.

You can’t get to know my personality by texting me. You can’t hear the inflection in my voice or hear how my day went if you don’t pick up the phone & call me.  You certainly aren’t focused on me if you text instead of call because hours can go by between texts, but a call can be wrapped up in 15-20 minutes.

I don’t get to hear your sexy voice if you’re always texting me. I can’t crack a joke over text the same way I can over the phone. I can’t sing to you if we aren’t talking. I can’t even focus on what I’m supposed to be doing if I have to keep checking my phone so I can respond to your texts. And I certainly can’t get anything done if I have to keep typing back & forth.

I try to compromise by texting back occasionally but don’t get it twisted – I would much rather talk to you then strain my neck & my fingers messaging you instead. So, why oh why men, do you insist on texting when you know it’s not what we want?! STOP texting me, and pick up the phone instead!

Chocolate Vent’s Quote of the Week: “YOU’RE NOT POWERFUL ENOUGH TO STOP GOD’S PLAN.”

Lord, the God of our ancestors, are you not the God who is in heaven? You rule over all the kingdoms of the nations. Power and might are in your hand, and no one can withstand you.” {2 Chronicles 20:6}