Tag: Blogger

Chocolate Vent’s Question of the Day – What is socially acceptable today that you do not approve of?

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My Pet Peeves

Like practically everyone else, I have a few (give or take) pet peeves. Here are a few  –

  • When people don’t have liquid soap in their guest bathroom – what’s up with bar soap in the guest bathroom?! I don’t want to rub my hands on the same bar of soap that every person has touched since the beginning of time. Liquid is always better.
  • When the outside of the trash can is dirty – I know trash is supposed to be dirty (and smelly, and ugly, etc.) & all, but the outside of the trash receptacle should be kept clean, IMO. This indicates a sense of hygiene – no matter how much “mess” you may have, you can still keep it contained without “looking a mess”.
  • My laptop & my cell phone show 2 different times – this is something that’s not supposed to happen, but it does. Every now and then I will see two different times on my screens. Fortunately, it has never caused me to be late or anything, but don’t even get me started on my alarm clock.
  • When people face their babies towards them in a stroller – why on earth would you think that your kid wants to stare at you instead of seeing the rest of the world like you? They have to look at your face all the time during the rest of the day so why subject them to that when there are so many other things to look at? I understand facing them backwards in a car seat or even in a chair (at the dining room table or in a restaurant) but when your kid is in a stroller and you’re out for a run, turn the stroller around so that your child can take in the sights of their surroundings.
  • Leaves the floor wet after a shower – so there’s been some pretty heated discussion around this. Some people believe that the purpose of the floor is to dry your feet & that your towel is to be used for the rest of your body. But I am a firm believer of drying off completely before even exiting the shower stall or bathtub. Each foot can be dried off right before hitting the floor outside of the shower but to avoid any excess wetness on your bathroom floor, a rug can be used to absorb the water.
  • Different smells when a meal is cooking – who doesn’t love to walk into a room with the smell of good food wafting about? I do! I do! A good smelling dish can really lift just about anyone’s spirits except when there are too many good smelling dishes going on at once.
  • People who chew gum with their mouth open – we all know that chewing with our mouths open is bad, but for some reason there are people who think that chewing gum with their mouths open is okay. People who chew gum with their mouth wide open are liable to start popping their gum and making a bunch of smacking noises. It’s annoying!
  • When people complain about something that they do – why complain about a job that you chose?! I know there are aspects to every job that we don’t like, but if you are working/volunteering, etc. then keep the complaining to a minimum, otherwise, find something else to do.
  • Dirty fingernails – just gross!

What are some of your pet peeves?

Everlasting Love

Have you ever been in a relationship and your boyfriend at the time wrote you a love letter?  Or, have you ever had a secret crush and you received a greeting card and nice note detailing his
adoration for you? If so, you probably scrutinized each word, took in every compliment and were sincerely flattered by the gesture, even if the feelings weren’t mutual.

Even if you’ve never received a love letter from an ex, I want to remind you that you actually have been given a love letter by someone, and that’s God. God loves you so much in that not only did He send His only begotten Son, Jesus, to die in your place for your sins (Isaiah 53:10)…not only did God send us the Holy Spirit to live inside of us and guide us after Jesus ascended back to heaven (John 14:16)…God made sure you are constantly reminded of His love and adoration for you as He inspired men to pen the pages of The Bible (2 Timothy 3:16) – so you’ll always know that you’re loved.

Never take for granted God’s love for you. Constantly remind yourself by reading parts of His  Love Letter to you each day.  God loves you with an unconditional, everlasting love that will never leave you nor forsake you (Hebrews 13:5). Not only that, He loves you so much that He has committed to spend the rest your life with you, including the afterlife – He wants to spend eternity with you. There is no greater love than the love of Jesus.  He is the greatest love of all.

The LORD hath appeared of old unto me, saying, Yea, I have loved thee with an everlasting love: therefore with loving kindness have I drawn thee.  Jeremiah 31:3

*Originally posted on Kim on the Web.

#SaturdayStamps: Anna Julia Cooper

Anna Julia Cooper, née Anna Julia Haywood was born August 10, 1858 in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. and died February 27, 1964 in Washington, D.C. was an American educator and writer whose book A Voice From the South by a Black Woman of the South became a classic African American feminist text.

Cooper was the daughter of a slave woman and her white slaveholder (or his brother). In 1868 she enrolled in the newly established Saint Augustine’s Normal School and Collegiate Institute (now Saint Augustine’s University), a school for freed slaves. She quickly distinguished herself as an excellent student, and, in addition to her studies, she began teaching mathematics part-time at age 10. While enrolled at Saint Augustine’s, she had a feminist awakening when she realized that her male classmates were encouraged to study a more rigorous curriculum than were the female students. After that early realization, she spent the rest of her life advocating for the education of black women.

In 1877 Anna married her classmate George Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband’s death, Cooper enrolled in Oberlin College in Ohio, graduating in 1884 with a B.S. in mathematics and receiving a master’s degree in mathematics in 1888. In 1887 she became a faculty member at the M Street High School (established in 1870 as the Preparatory High School for Negro Youth) in Washington, D.C. There she taught mathematics, science, and, later, Latin.

During the 1890s Cooper became involved in the black women’s club movement. Women’s club members were generally educated middle-class women who believed that it was their duty to help less-fortunate African Americans. During that time Cooper became a popular public speaker. She addressed a wide variety of groups, including the National Conference of Colored Women in 1895 and the first Pan-African Conference in 1900.

In 1902 Cooper was named principal of the M Street High School. As principal, she enhanced the academic reputation of the school, and under her tenure several M Street graduates were admitted to Ivy League schools. Cooper’s controversial emphasis on college preparatory courses irked critics (such as Booker T. Washington) who favoured vocational education for blacks. Using trumped-up charges, the District of Columbia Board of Education refused to renew her contract for the 1905–06 school year. Undaunted, Cooper continued her career as an educator, teaching for four years at Lincoln University, a historically black college in Jefferson City, Missouri. In 1910 she was rehired as a teacher at M Street (renamed Dunbar High School after 1916), where she stayed until 1930.

In 1911 Cooper began studying part-time for a doctoral degree. In 1925, at age 67, she received a doctorate from the Sorbonne in Paris, having written her dissertation on slavery. Written in French, it was published in English as Slavery and the French Revolutionists, 1788–1805.

In addition to her scholarly activities, Cooper reared two foster children and five adoptive children on a teacher’s salary. From 1930 to 1941 she served as president of the Frelinghuysen University for working adults in Washington, D.C. She died in her sleep at age 105.