Tag: Blog

#TheologyThursday: William Pannell

“Bill” Pannell was born in Sturgis, Michigan. He gave his life to Christ during his junior year in high school, thanks to some Christian friends. The seeds to his conversion were sown many years previously in Sunday school at a local Plymouth Brethren Church. Pannell received his BA from Fort Wayne Bible College in Indiana, in 1951. He went on to study black history at Wayne State University in Detroit. In 1980 he earned an MA in Social Ethics from the University of Southern California.

Pannell has had far-ranging evangelistic experience at both the practical and the academic levels. After graduating from Fort Wayne, he became an evangelist, preaching and teaching throughout the United States. From 1955 to 1965, he served as an assistant pastor in Detroit, as well as area youth director for the Brethren Assembly youth. In 1964 he was named assistant director of leadership training with Youth for Christ, serving in that capacity until 1968, when he joined Tom Skinner Associates as associate evangelist and vice president.

He remained with that ministry until 1974, when he joined Fuller as assistant professor of evangelism and director of the Black Pastors’ Program (later the African American Church Studies Program). Before joining the faculty at Fuller, Pannell was the first African American to serve on Fuller Seminary’s Board of Trustees (1971–1974). In 1992 he was appointed as the Arthur DeKruyter/Christ Church Oak Brook Professor of Preaching, a role in which he served until 2000. He also served as dean of the chapel from 1992 to 1998. In 1993 he was selected by his faculty colleagues to receive the C. Davis Weyerhaeuser Award for Excellence.

In addition, Pannell received an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from Malone College in Ohio, an honorary Doctor of Christian Service degree from Geneva College in Pennsylvania, and an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, from Taylor University in Indiana.

Pannell has served on boards of Youth for Christ USA, which he chaired in 1980, and the Academy of Evangelism, which he served as president from 1983 to 1984. He has been an active participant in conferences on evangelism throughout the world and is a sought-after guest lecturer at Christian colleges and universities throughout the United States. He currently serves on the board of Taylor University in Indiana.

His books include My Friend, the Enemy (Word 1968), Evangelism from the Bottom Up (Zondervan 1992), and The Coming Race Wars? A Cry for Reconciliation (Zondervan 1993). His research interests include preaching and spirituality.

Pannell and his wife, Hazel, live in Altadena, California. They have two sons, Philip and Peter.

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#HumpDayLoveDay: 5 Scientific Reasons Why Women Love Fat Guys

Being overweight can cause a variety of health problems for men, including heart disease, diabetes, and upping their kid’s chances of being obese. Fortunately for heterosexual guys, however, women tend to be surprisingly forgiving about the flaws of the male body, perhaps because they have fewer neurons in their visual cortexes. There’s ample evidence that women prefer a man with a little extra to hold onto.

We’re not suggesting men pack on the pounds to enhance their love lives—women can’t protect you from diabetes, so you’d best put that cookie back in the jar. But the following five scientific explanations for why women love those love handles should, at the very least boost can boost the confidence of big guys.

You’re A Product Of Evolution. Sort Of. 

“Those who could store fat easily had an evolutionary advantage in the harsh environment of early hunters and gatherers,” Garabed Eknoyan of the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in a 2006. “This ability to store surplus fat from the least possible amount of food intake may have made the difference between life and death.” Indeed, in early human history weight was a status symbol—it meant that you had the resources to survive, and share with a spouse. Although modern women are more likely to be attracted to money than food, old habits die hard. It’s possible, Eknoyan writes, that traces of this instinctual attraction for fat linger, even when it doesn’t come with a penthouse.

Your Love Handles Can Handle Longer Lovemaking

Husky men are better in bed (and not just because they occasionally bring snacks) according to a survey of 2,544 British women. Thirty-eight percent reported that overweight or plus-size men were superior lovers. It’s not totally clear why extra cushion improves the pushing, but research suggests stamina might have something to do with it. Men with noticeable bellies and higher BMIs last 7.3 minutes longer in bed than slimmer men, a 2010 study from the International Journal of Impotence Research found. And that’s 7.3 minutes you don’t have to spend in the gym.

Everyone Trusts The Fat Guy

People consider heavier male politicians more trustworthy than thin ones, according to research out of the University of Missouri. This, unfortunately, explains how Chris Christie is still in office. But it also may explain why women are attracted to fat men in general—everyone wants to be with someone they trust. Of course, skinny politicians like Anthony Weiner sometimes sneak in under the radar. And everyone who trusts them pays the price…

All Fat Guys Are Funny…Right?

There’s a substantial amount of evidence that women are more attracted to men who can make them laugh. (In tribute to everything wrong with the world, it doesn’t work the other way around). While all fat men aren’t necessarily funny, pop culture has socialized most people to believe that they are until proven otherwise. This leaves overweight men with the option of either working out or working on their material. Wouldn’t want to disappoint the ladies…

Everyone Looks Thin Next To A Fat Guy
Let’s face it—for every one study that says men aren’t judged for their bodies, there’s another 10 saying that women are positively flayed for theirs. So partnering with a man who’s not obsessed with his body might make a woman feel a little more secure about her own. This, of course, on top of the literal comfort of cuddling with your cozy dad bod.

*Originally published on Fatherly.

The History of Black History Month

During the dawning decades of the twentieth century, it was commonly presumed that black people had little history besides the subjugation of slavery. Today, it is clear that blacks have significantly impacted the development of the social, political, and economic structures of the United States and the world. Credit for the evolving awareness of the true place of blacks in history can, in large part, be bestowed on one man, Carter G. Woodson. And, his brainchild the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Inc. is continuing Woodson’s tradition of disseminating information about black life, history and culture to the global community.

Recognizing the dearth of information on the accomplishments of blacks in 1915, Dr. Woodson founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, now called the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH).

Under Woodson’s pioneering leadership, the Association created research and publication outlets for black scholars with the establishment of the Journal of Negro History (1916) and the Negro History Bulletin (1937), which garners a popular public appeal.

In 1926, Dr. Woodson initiated the celebration of Negro History Week, which corresponded with the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. In 1976, this celebration was expanded to include the entire month of February, and today Black History Month garners support throughout the country as people of all ethnic and social backgrounds discuss the black experience. ASALH views the promotion of Black History Month as one of the most important components of advancing Dr.Woodson’s legacy.

In honor of all the work that Dr. Carter G. Woodson has done to promote the study of African American History, an ornament of Woodson hangs on the White House’s Christmas tree each year.

*Originally posted on ASALH.org

#SaturdayStamps: The 13th Amendment

The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified in 1865 in the aftermath of the Civil War, abolished slavery in the United States. The 13th Amendment states: “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

On January 31, 1865, the House of Representatives passed the proposed amendment with a vote of 119-56, just over the required two-thirds majority. The following day, Lincoln approved a joint resolution of Congress submitting it to the state legislatures for ratification.

The year after the amendment’s passage, Congress used this power to pass the nation’s first civil rights bill, the Civil Rights Act of 1866. The law invalidated the so-called black codes, those laws put into place in the former Confederate states that governed the behavior of blacks, effectively keeping them dependent on their former owners.

Congress also required the former Confederate states to ratify the 13th Amendment in order to regain representation in the federal government. Together with the 14th and 15th Amendments, also ratified during the Reconstruction era, the 13th Amendment sought to establish equality for black Americans. Despite these efforts, the struggle to achieve full equality and guarantee the civil rights of all Americans would continue well into the 20th & 21st century.

Remembering James Ingram (1952-2019)

Ingram, an Ohio native, got his start as a musician with the band Revelation Funk and later played keyboards for Ray Charles. He was nominated for 14 Grammy Awards, winning for best male R&B performance for his song “One Hundred Ways” in 1981 and best R&B performance for a duo or group in 1984 for “Yah Mo B There.”  His duet with Patti Austin, “How Do You Keep the Music Playing,” earned an Oscar nomination for best original song in 1983.
Over the course of his career, Ingram also had successful collaborations with Linda Rondstadt, Quincy Jones, Barry White and Dolly Parton. He co-wrote Michael Jackson’s hit song “P.Y.T. (Pretty Young Thing)” with Jones.
Ingram was also nominated for two Golden Globe Awards — one in 1994 for best original song for “The Day I Fall in Love” and again in the same category the following year for “Look What Love Has Done.”

Do Men Like This Exist?

The older you get as a single person, the more you start to wonder whether or not the right person is out there for you. Sure, you review your standards to make sure they aren’t too out of control but at the end of the day, you question more & more whether or not you’ll ever meet “The One.”

I know that there are some good single men out there but WHERE ARE THEY?? All the good single men I know are either considerably unattractive, dull, not engaging or just not interested in marriage. (As a side note, I do find it amusing that women are supposed to “settle” in the looks department, as if a woman doesn’t deserve to be attracted to the man she’s with)

Aside from the usual things that women want in a man, I also want:

  • A guy who COMMUNICATES WELL
  • A guy who calls when he says he will
  • A guy who is EMOTIONALLY HEALTHY and available
  • A guy who is ACTIVELY SEEKING A SERIOUS relationship
  • A guy who knows how to TREASURE a good woman and treat me RIGHT (can I get an amen?!)

Is this too much to ask for? I think not. People tell me that single men like this exist, I just don’t know where they are. Again, I’m not disputing that good men do exist, it’s just they never seem to come in a package that most women can recognize.