Tag: Blog

Why Is Dating So Hard?

 

Dating From A –> Z (literally!)

Need some date ideas? From A to Z, here are some things you can suggest for a fun evening out –

A – aquarium, arcade, art gallery

B – biking, brewery, bonfire, B&B, boating, bowling, batting cages

C – camping, cook, comedy show

D – dancing, dinner, dive bar, drive-in movies, dog walking

E – escape room, exercise

F – football, fishing, festival, fondue restaurant, frisbee golf

G – game night, go-kart racing, ghost tour, garden, greenhouse

H – hiking, happy hour, hockey game, horseback riding

I – inline skating, ice cream, ice-skating

J – jazz music, splurge on junk food

K – karaoke, kayaking, kickboxing

L – line dancing, live music, laser tag

M – massage, museum, mini-golf, music

N – new restaurants, new experiences

O – opera, open theatre, anything outdoors

P – picnic, photoshoot, paint, progressive dinner

Q – a quadruple date

R – road trip, race track, rock climbing, read together

S – scavenger hunt, watch a sunset, stargaze, staycation

T – theme park, top golf, touristy stuff, trampoline park, play tennis

U – unplug, hear a university lecture together

V – volunteer, vineyard, volleyball, visiting with others, vintage shopping

X –  eXploring

Y – yoga, peruse yard sales

Z – ziplining, zoo

Failure

Failure is an important part of success. Through our mistakes, we can:

1.Learn what NOT to do – If what you’re doing isn’t working then you know that it might be time to try something different. This doesn’t make you a total failure, but this information can at least guide you towards changing things up.

  1. If you’re not reaching your goals, ask yourself, “Why not?” – Find out what it is that’s standing in your way between you & success. Is it not having enough time or insufficient funds? Maybe it’s naysayers or lack of resources? Whatever it is, pinpoint those reasons & start working on them one by one.

3.Learn what to keep doing – Between the things that went “wrong,” there are probably a million things you did right. Remember these things & improve upon them.

4.Build resilience – Trying & failing at something teaches us about facing adversity and overcoming our challenges. Resilience is a valuable skill to apply to your professional and personal life.

5.Gain confidence – Viewing failure as a learning opportunity takes away the scariness of trying something new. Not to mention confidence is sexy!

5.Discover hidden strengths – In many cases, failing at one thing will show that you’re better at something else. You never know what you may discover about yourself!

 

Here’s your challenge: Identify a few of your recent failures. Jot down what you learned from them and think about what you can do to improve your actions (and your responses) in the future. Share your list with a friend, and encourage them to do the same – then offer your advice/support to help each other make the best of your failures!

Feel free to share in the comments some of your biggest successes & even share pictures if you’ve got some!

Remembering Damon Keith (1922-2019)

Judge Damon J. Keith has had an illustrious career. Born on July 4, 1922, he has served as a United States Court of Appeals judge for the Sixth Circuit since 1977. Keith was the youngest of six children born to Annie and Perry Alexander Keith and the first to attend college. He graduated from West Virginia State College in 1943 and was then drafted into the military. His experiences in the segregated Army strengthened his conviction to the cause of civil rights. Keith received a J.D. from Howard Law School in 1949, passed the Michigan bar exam in 1950, and earned an L.L.M. from Wayne State University School of Law in 1956.

In 1964, Keith established his own law practice, Keith, Conyers, Anderson, Brown, & Wahls, with four other African American attorneys. Keith was also very active in the Democratic Party and used his political connections to help his community. He served as the chair to the Detroit Housing Commission and the Michigan Civil Rights Commission. In 1967, President Lyndon Johnson appointed Keith to the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, where he served as Chief Judge from 1975 to 1977 before President Jimmy Carter appointed him to the Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Keith took senior status in 1995.

In 1993, the Damon J. Keith Law Collection, an archival resource devoted to the substantial historical accomplishments of African American lawyers and judges as well as the African American legal experience, was created at Wayne State University and named in his honor. Keith has received numerous awards and honors, including: thirty-eight honorary degrees from various colleges and universities; the NAACP’s highest award, the Spingarn Medal; the 1997 American Bar Association’s Thurgood Marshall Award; the Detroit Urban League’s 1998 Distinguished Warrior Award; the Distinguished Public Service Award for the National Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith; the prestigious Edward J. Devitt Award for Distinguished Service to Justice; the Pinnacle Award at the 2000 Trumpet Awards in Atlanta; and the American Bar Association Spirit of Excellence Award in 2001.

Keith has also received the lifetime achievement award from the National Black College Alumni and was inducted into their Hall of Fame. Keith is married to Rachel Boone Keith, M.D., with whom he has three daughters.

Keith passed away on April 28, 2019.

Remembering John Singleton (1968-2019)

John Daniel Singleton was born on January 6, 1968, in Los Angeles, California. He grew up in South Central Los Angeles and his work as a film director, producer and screenwriter depicted these turbulent, often violent roots.

Singleton studied screenwriting at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts, winning three writing awards from the university, which led to a contract with Creative Artists Agency during his sophomore year.

In 1991, Columbia Pictures bought his script for Boyz n the Hood and budgeted it at $7 million. The film portrayed life in crime-ridden South Central L.A. and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Director in 1991, making Singleton the first African-American and the youngest person ever nominated for the award. The film also garnered a nomination for Best Original Screenplay.

Singleton followed the win with Poetic Justice in 1993 and Higher Learning in 1995. Both films examined modern race relations, and while they enjoyed success at the box office, they were not as highly praised by critics as his debut effort.

Subsequent works include 1997’s historical drama Rosewood, 2000’s Shaft remake starring Samuel L. Jackson and 2001’s Baby Boy. In 2005, he produced the critically acclaimed indie film Hustle & Flow and directed the box office hit Four Brothers.

Singleton was married to Ghanaian princess and actress Akosua Gyamama Busia from 1996 to 1997; they had one daughter together.

In April 2019, Singleton suffered a stroke and was placed in a medically induced coma at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He passed away on April 29, 2019.