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Your Cup Runs Over

TODAY’S SCRIPTURE

“You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies. You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows.” (Psalm 23:5 NIV)

TODAY’S WORD

God’s dream for your life is that you would be blessed in such a way that you could be a blessing to others. David said, “My cup runs over.” God is an overflow God. But here’s the key: you can’t go around thinking thoughts of lack, not enough, or struggle and expect to have abundance. If you’ve been under pressure for a long time and have difficulty making ends meet, it’s easy to develop a limited mindset. “I’ll never get out of this neighborhood.” Or, “I’ll never have enough to send my kids to college.” No, that may be where you are now, but that’s not where you have to stay. God is called El Shaddai, the God of More than Enough! Not the God of Barely Enough. Not the God of Just Help Me Make it Through. No, He’s the God of Overflow!

Today, no matter what you may be experiencing, stir yourself up in faith and declare who God is in your life. Declare that He is well able; declare that He is more than enough! Declare that your cup runs over with the blessing and victory He has prepared for you!

A PRAYER FOR TODAY

Father, thank You for Your grace, favor and mercy to me. I know that You are preparing a place of blessing for me. I know that my cup runs over, and as I press into You, I will walk in Your blessing in Jesus’ name. Amen.

— Joel & Victoria Osteen

#SaturdayStamps: John Johnson

John Johnson, the founder of Johnson Publishing Company, which publishes Ebony and Jet magazines, is the 35th honoree in the Black Heritage stamp series. The Postal Service has recognized the achievements of prominent African Americans through the Black Heritage series since 1978. Past honorees have included Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Madam C.J. Walker, Paul Robeson, Jackie Robinson, Marian Anderson, Langston Hughes and Barbara Jordan.

“John Johnson’s unyielding commitment to journalistic excellence and his unparalleled reporting on African American culture have distinguished him as one of America’s greatest publishers,” said USPS Chicago Senior Plant Manager Anthony Vaughan.

Joining Vaughan to dedicate the stamp at Johnson Publishing Company’s Chicago offices today were Linda Johnson Rice, chairman, Johnson Publishing Co.; Desiree Rogers, CEO, Johnson Publishing Co.; Rahm Emanuel, mayor, Chicago; Richard M. Daley, former mayor, Chicago; U.S. Rep. Danny Davis, 7th Congressional District; and Rev. James Meeks, Salem Baptist Church of Chicago.

“I’m immensely proud that my father and his life’s passion are being recognized in such a high honor as the Black Heritage Stamp,” said Linda Johnson Rice. “His legacy lives on in all whom he touched and in the work we continue to do daily.” The stamp goes on sale today at Post Offices nationwide, online at usps.com and by phone at 800-782-6724.

From poverty to the pinnacle of American society, Johnson’s journey was extraordinary. He was born in Arkansas City, AR., where schools were segregated and there were no high schools for black students. By the time of his death at age 87, he commanded a business empire encompassing magazines, cosmetics, radio stations, book publishing and more. In 1982, he became the first black person to appear on Forbes magazine’s annual list of the 400 wealthiest people in America.

Johnson was the trailblazing publisher of Negro Digest, Ebony, Jet, and other magazines that showcased African American accomplishments at a time when such affirmation was rare in mainstream media. In 1946, the year after it was founded, Ebony landed its first national advertising account. Selling advertising space to white-owned corporations and persuading them to use black models in their ads were major breakthroughs.

In recognition of his achievements, Johnson received many prizes and honors, including the NAACP’s prestigious Spingarn Medal in 1966 and being named publisher of the year by industry peers in 1972. President Clinton awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996, and a panel of experts polled by Baylor University in 2003 named Johnson the greatest minority entrepreneur in American history.

The Lord Will Provide

He has given food and provision to those who reverently and worshipfully fear Him; He will remember His covenant forever and imprint it [on His mind]. —Psalm 111:5

Do you have financial worries or concerns about provision in your life right now? If you find yourself worried that you will not have enough, you’re not alone. I have found that many people have the same fear.

Today’s scripture teaches us that as long as we have reverence for God and worship Him, we can count on Him to provide for us.  I believe this principle is an important key to having our needs met. If we maintain reverent attitudes toward God and are faithful to worship Him, then we will be able to live in faith instead of fear when needs arise.

Maybe you are facing the possibility of losing your job or your home. Maybe you are working as hard as you can, but your income simply is not enough to support your family. Maybe you are living on Social Security and wondering what the future holds for you. You see prices rising continually and the enemy whispers, “You aren’t going to have enough to live on.”

I encourage you to commit today’s scripture to memory. Meditate on it often, and obey it. As you worship the Lord, remind yourself of all the ways He has taken care of you throughout your life; thank Him for all He has done for you; ask Him for wisdom; and tell Him that you love Him and trust Him to meet every need in your life.

Love God Today: “Thank You, Lord, for being a faithful, trustworthy Provider for me as I continue to worship You.”

– Joyce Meyer

#SaturdayStamps: Robert Robinson Taylor

The stamp honors Robert Robinson Taylor (1868-1942). The son of emancipated slaves, he was the first black student to attend the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).  When he graduated in 1892, he became the first fully accredited African-American architect in America.

During his time at MIT, Taylor met Booker T. Washington.  President of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, Washington focused on education to fight discrimination in the post-Civil War South.  He was impressed with Taylor and recruited him to teach at the school.

As the drafting instructor and architect to the Tuskegee Institute, Taylor was dedicated to promoting Washington’s self-help philosophy.  His architectural debut, Science Hall, was constructed entirely by the students, right down to the bricks.  But Taylor’s second project, the Tuskegee Chapel, was his proudest accomplishment.  Washington once referred to it as the most imposing building on campus.  Taylor’s designs and structures were said to epitomize the institute’s standards of excellence.

Taylor spent the majority of his career at Tuskegee.  He became a model of achievement   through his many contributions – a symbol of pride for the Tuskegee Institute and the nation.

The God Of Wonders

Thou art the God that doest wonders:  thou hast declared thy strength among the people. Thou hast with thine arm redeemed thy people, the sons of Jacob and Joseph. Selah.The waters saw thee, O God, the waters saw thee; they were afraid : the depths also were troubled. (Psalm 77:14-16)

Within our world of modern technology and conveniences, it is so easy to take the things of God for granted.  God has blessed us with things well beyond our greatest imaginations.  However, with the easy convenience of everything, we sometimes forget that none of these things would be possible without God’s grace in our lives.  No matter how much we may attain, we are not self-sufficient. Every good and perfect gift is from God.  Whenever we face situations that seem insurmountable, we need to remember that God is in control.  He is the God of wonders who does what seems impossible. Just ask those who have been healed of terminal illnesses.  No situation is too big or small for God.  We need to trust him with all of our cares for he cares for us.

Prayer:  Father, as you are more than we could ever imagine, teach us to remember all of your wonderful works in our lives.  Teach us, O Lord, to fully trust in you.  In Jesus’ name, amen.

— Joel & Victoria Osteen

#SaturdayStamps: Mary Church Terrell and Mary White Ovington 

Mary White Ovington (April 11, 1865 in Brooklyn, New York – July 15, 1951) a suffragette, socialist, unitarian, journalist, and co-founder of the NAACP.

Her parents, members of the Unitarian Church were supporters of women’s rights and had been involved in anti-slavery movement. Educated at Packer Collegiate Institute and Radcliffe College, Ovington became involved in the campaign for civil rights in 1890 after hearing Frederick Douglass speak in a Brooklyn church.

In 1895 she helped found the Greenpoint Settlement in Brooklyn. Appointed head of the project the following year, Ovington remained until 1904 when she was appointed fellow of the Greenwich House Committee on Social Investigations. Over the next five years she studied employment and housing problems in black Manhattan. During her investigations she met William Du Bois, an African American from Harvard University, and she was introduced to the founding members of the Niagara Movement.

Influenced by the ideas of William Morris, Ovington joined the Socialist Party in 1905, where she met people such as Daniel De Leon, Asa Philip Randolph, Floyd Dell, Max Eastman and Jack London, who argued that racial problems were as much a matter of class as of race. She wrote for radical journals and newspapers such as, The Masses, New York Evening Post, and The Call. She also worked with Ray Stannard Baker and influenced the content of his book, Following the Color Line (1908).

On September 3, 1908 she read an article written by socialist William English Walling entitled “Race War in the North” in The Independent. Walling described a massive race riot directed at black residents in the hometown of Abraham Lincoln, Springfield, Illinois that led to seven deaths, 40 homes and 24 businesses destroyed, and 107 indictments against rioters. Walling ended the article by calling for a powerful body of citizens to come to the aid blacks. Ovington responded to the article by writing Walling and meeting at his apartment in New York City along with social worker Dr. Henry Moskowitz. The group decided to launch a campaign by issuing a “call” for a national conference on the civil and political rights of African-Americans on the centennial of Lincoln’s birthday, February 12, 1909. Many responded to the “call” that eventually led to the formation of the National Negro Committee that held its first meeting in New York on May 31 and June 1, 1909. By May, 1910 the National Negro Committee and attendants, at its second conference, organized a permanent body known as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) where Ovington was appointed as its executive secretary. Early members included Josephine Ruffin, Mary Talbert, Mary Church Terrell, Inez Milholland, Jane Addams, George Henry White, William Du Bois, Charles Edward Russell, John Dewey, Charles Darrow, Lincoln Steffens, Ray Stannard Baker, Fanny Garrison Villard, Oswald Garrison Villard and Ida Wells-Barnett.

The following year she attended the Universal Races Congress in London. Ovington remained active in the struggle for women’s suffrage and as a pacifist opposed America’s involvement in the First World War. During the war Ovington supported Asa Philip Randolph and his magazine, The Messenger, which campaigned for black civil rights.

After the war Ovington served the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People as board member, executive secretary and chairman. The NAACP fought a long legal battle against segregation and racial discrimination in housing, education, employment, voting and transportation. They appealed to the Supreme Court to rule that several laws passed by southern states were unconstitutional and won three important judgments between 1915-1923 concerning voting rights and housing.

She wrote several books and articles including a study of black Manhattan, Half a Man (1911), Status of the Negro in the United States (1913), Socialism and the Feminist Movement (1914), an anthology for black children, The Upward Path (1919), biographical sketches of prominent African Americans, Portraits in Color (1927), an autobiography, Reminiscences (1932) and a history of the NAACP, The Walls Come Tumbling Down (1947).

Ovington retired as a board member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1947 and in doing so, ended decades of service with the organization. She died in 1951.