Chocolate Vent’s Quote of the Week: “IN ORDER TO FULFILL YOUR DESTINY, YOU HAVE TO GET OVER YOUR PAST.”

“With this in mind, we constantly pray for you, that our God may make you worthy of his calling, and that by his power he may bring to fruition your every desire for goodness and your every deed prompted by faith. We pray this so that the name of our Lord Jesus may be glorified in you, and you in him, according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ.” {2 Thessalonians 1:11-12}

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Peace Over Worry

Have you ever worried about something, so much so to the point where you found yourself not being able to stop thinking about it , or even lay awake all night long?  
Have you ever questioned or second-guessed a decision you made, or had regrets in regards to the outcome of a previous relationship?
The Word reminds how there’s no use in worrying about something, because it won’t help the situation either way (Matthew 6:25-27).
Worrying about something only leaves you stressed out; nothing good comes from it.
Worrying is also an indicator that you haven’t given something totally over to the Lord; instead of casting the care, you’ve decided to take it on yourself – I’ve definitely been there before more than once in my own personal life.
What I’ve come to realize though, is that ultimately, God is in control – there’s nothing I could say, or could have said, or could have done to change the situation or make it work out the way I wanted it to – I had to learn to just let go, let God, and move on.
Once I finally decided to do that, then the Lord blessed me with peace. A peace that passes all understanding.  A peace that lets me know the storm is over, and that it’s now okay to continue in His will.
Never take for granted that peace is a blessing from God to us, His children.  
Having peace in your heart is an indicator of total trust, total reliance, total dependence on God – no matter what it looks like, no matter what it feels like, peace can sleep through the storm like Jesus did as his disciples awoke him during the literal storm – all Jesus did was wake up out of his sleep and say, “Peace, be still” and at His Word alone it ceased (Mark 4:39).
So goodbye worry, goodbye fear.
No longer will it grip your life and cause you to look behind instead of ahead.
    The Lord will give strength unto his people; the Lord will bless His people with peace. Psalm 28:11
*Originally published on Kim on the Web.

Introducing: Mayor LaToya Cantrell!

Mayor Cantrell’s life has been steeped in community service. As a little girl, her grandmother would bring her to neighborhood meetings, and by the age of 13, she was serving as secretary for her local chamber of commerce.

“My soul found its home in New Orleans,” is how Mayor Cantrell describes her arrival in 1990 as a student at Xavier University. After graduation, she and her husband, Jason, bought a home in the Broadmoor neighborhood, and Cantrell became an active member of her new community.

As the President of the Broadmoor Improvement Association, Cantrell led the neighborhood’s redevelopment following Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures. Flooding decimated Broadmoor, but through citizen engagement and Cantrell’s leadership, Broadmoor is now considered an international model for disaster recovery.

Elected to the City Council in 2012, Cantrell has prioritized improving people’s lives.

On May 7, 2018, Mayor Cantrell was sworn in as the first female Mayor of New Orleans, just in time to celebrate the city’s tricentennial, or 300th anniversary.

She is a dedicated wife to her husband, Jason, proud mother of her daughter, RayAnn, and a parishioner at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church.

Mayor Cantrell pledges to produce results that will create a more equitable and safe New Orleans for all residents.

#ThursdayReads: Yaa Gyasi

Yaa Gyasi is the author of Homegoing, one of the most celebrated debuts of 2016. A riveting, kaleidoscopic novel, Homegoing is a story of race, history, ancestry, love, and time that traces the descendants of two sisters torn apart in eighteenth-century Africa across three hundred years in Ghana and AmericaAn important new literary voice, Gyasi’s writing has been praised by National Book Award winner Ta-Nehisi Coates as “an inspiration” and “what happens when you pair a gifted literary mind to an epic task.” In September 2016, she was chosen by Coates as one of the National Book Foundation’s “5 Under 35” honorees. Personable and intimate, Gyasi’s lectures explore contemporary craft, cultural identity, and the complex racial landscape of America’s past and present.

Homegoing is the story of two half-sisters, Effia and Esi, born into different villages in eighteenth-century Ghana. Effia is married off to an Englishman and will live in comfort in the palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle, raising children who will be sent abroad to be educated before returning to the Gold Coast to serve as administrators of the empire. Esi, imprisoned beneath Effia in the Castle’s women’s dungeon and then shipped off on a boat bound for America, will be sold into slavery. Homegoing stretches from the wars of Ghana to slavery and the Civil War in America, from the coal mines in the American South to the Great Migration and twentieth-century Harlem. A powerful and emotional American novel about race and history, this is truly a book for our times.

Born in Ghana and raised in Huntsville, Alabama, Gyasi is a graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop and lives in Berkeley, California.