President Obama To Rename Africa Program For Nelson Mandela

Chocolate Vent:

Way to go President Obama!

Originally posted on GOOD BLACK NEWS:

obama-africa

WASHINGTON (AP) — A program designed to foster a new generation of young African leaders will be renamed after former South African President Nelson Mandela.

President Barack Obama, who has said he was one of the untold millions of people around the world who were inspired by Mandela’s life, is set to announce the name change at a town hall-style event Monday in Washington with several hundred young leaders from across sub-Saharan Africa.

The youngsters are participating in the inaugural Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, part of the broader Young African Leaders Initiative that Obama launched in 2010 to support a new generation of leadership there. The fellowship is being renamed as a tribute to Mandela, who died last December at age 95.

Obama announced the fellowship during a stop in South Africa last summer. It connects young African leaders to leadership training opportunities at top…

View original 142 more words

Annoying Things People Do At The Gym

Many times I’ve written about my likes & dislikes at the gym. A lot of the things I see at the gym are either very distracting or just plain ridiculous. Now, I’d like to share with you some of the annoying things I see from people at the gym:
Not workout – Why bother coming if you know you don’t really plan to get in a good sweat? Watching yourself in the mirror does not count as exercise.

Gym 1

Asking me if you can go in between my reps – Leave me alone! You can use it when I’m done. Forgive me for not allowing you to use the machine that I’m working on. Just come back when the machine is empty because I’m not moving. I’ve already wiped down someone else’s sweat & I’m not about to wipe yours.

reps

Not putting their weights away – I don’t lift 200lbs on the leg press so why should I have to put it away just so I could use it? People need to just put their weights back before they walk away. What’s even worse is when people leave their plates leaning up against the places where people walk and either trip or crush their toes. Someone could be seriously injured causing them to miss out for several weeks on their exercise just because you were lazy & negligent.

rerack

Spitting in the water fountain – That’s just gross!

spitting

• Too much hairspray or perfume – I shouldn’t have to stay away from an entire area just because you overdosed on beauty products. The only overwhelming stench I should smell is sweat & B.O.

too much prefume

Not wiping their sweat off of the equipment when they’re done using it – Oh my goodness this drives me insane! I wipe down equipment before and after I use, so why shouldn’t everyone else?! Your sweat is no better than anyone else’s, buddy!

clean

People who try to chat me up – Don’t you see I have headphones on? I am usually very focused on my workout so I don’t have time to discuss last night’s TV episode or my weekend plans. And don’t think just because I’m taking a break you can have an extended conversation with me either. If I didn’t start talking to you first, keep it moving.

standing around

Play on the phone – Your music playlist should already be programmed into your phone. Other than hitting play & occasionally pressing pause, why are you pressing any other buttons on your phone when you should be pressing the buttons on the treadmill instead?!

playing on phone

Women who are stronger and/or better looking than me – How dare they come to the gym when they are already looking fit & trim? Those people shouldn’t be allowed in. The nerve of some people, I tell ya!

Sex at the gym

Help, My Coworker Has Strong Body Odor!

It’s summer. It’s sweaty. And sometimes that means people are trailing some pungent body odors that their colleagues can’t help but smell. But how do you tactfully inform co-workers that they stink and need to address it? As Cath Ludeman-Hall will tell you, it isn’t easy.
She was just out of college and a newbie at a staffing firm when she was asked to gently talk to an older worker in a retail warehouse after his colleagues complained that he stank. “The company loved him and wanted to hire him permanently,” she remembers. “However, he did have a pretty strong body odor issue.”
The man was a recent immigrant, Ludeman-Hall remembers — hard-working and earnest. Twenty years later, she still remembers the details. She brought a kit of deodorant and soap to offer him. In addition to overcoming her own mortification, she says, she also had to bridge a difference in how his culture regarded sweat.
“As a man, his virility, his masculinity was associated with his smell,” she says. “Are you asking him to redefine who he is to fit into an office environment where he’s making $4.50 an hour?”
She figured out an acceptable way to frame the issue; the man apologized, complied and was eventually hired.
A global workforce just complicates matters, says Steve Fitzgerald, vice president of human resources for Avaya, a telecom software firm with offices worldwide. “There are personal hygiene standards in all societies,” Fitzgerald says, “and there are times when people deviate from those standards. And when those deviations occur, then I think you enter into that moment where, as an H.R. professional, you groan, and you go, ‘Oh, God, I’ve to go have that conversation.’ “
Be Direct, Compassionate And Discreet
That conversation can be triggered in any number of ways. Some people develop odors from eating spicy foods; some don’t wash their hair often. “We have a lot of older workers in the workforce nowadays, and sometimes incontinence can be an issue,” he says. “Bad breath.”
Margaret Fiester, a director of the Knowledge Center at the Society for Human Resource Management, says her group fields a couple of calls every week from human resources professionals asking how to broach the body odor issue. She advises discussing it in private, being direct and showing compassion for the offender.
But really, Fiester says, the people calling in often need their own moral support. For them, she says, “This is sort of like a rite of passage, almost.”
I asked her where this topic ranks in the pantheon of embarrassing talks, and she says she ranks it “probably No. 1 or No. 2.”
Fiester speaks from experience. Years ago, she had the talk with a welder working in a hot manufacturing plant in Alabama, who was really embarrassed. “I thought he was going to cry,” she says. “I think I was going to cry.”
Several Showers A Day Couldn’t Eliminate The Odor
But imagine what it’s like to be on the receiving end of such a talk. Jennifer LaChance struggled with severe body odor brought on by anxiety since her teen years.
“I could take several showers a day and still have some degree of odor,” she remembers. Deodorants, soaps and medication didn’t solve it. LaChance says she abandoned dreams of becoming a teacher, because she couldn’t bear the thought of sidling up to parents at teacher conferences. Instead, she went to work at an insurance firm. She says she tried being open with co-workers and supervisors about her medical issue. Still, emails from HR started to circulate in the office, imploring colleagues to address their body odor.
“After that email circulates,” LaChance says, “you’ve got a hundred eyeballs zeroed in on you. There’s nothing that feels more hostile or more devastating than that.”
LaChance felt deeply embarrassed, immediately left work and resigned days later. I just felt like, wow, there’s no place for me,” she says. “I never want to walk into an office again. I don’t want to be an offensive person to anybody.”
Now, she says, she’s back in school studying medical data management — a job she says she can do largely from home, and avoid having body odor be an issue for her at work.
Smells
*Article originally published on NPR.